Student Finance England email

Say you earn £25,725, and get a pay rise to £30,725. Based on the current repayment rate, 9pc of that £5,000 would go on your student loan, plus 20pc on income tax and 12pc on National Insurance. A new phishing email claiming to be from Student Finance England is currently in circulation. A phishing email is a fraudulent email that tries to trick the reader into providing login details or other information. The email that is currently in circulation claims that accounts have been suspended due to incomplete student information. Please note, this line is only for students who can’t get student finance through Student Finance England, Student Finance Wales or Student Finance Northern Ireland. If you’re not sure if this ... Need to get in touch with Student Finance? Here are all the contact details you need for Student Finance in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Note : Parents and partners need the student’s consent before Student Finance England can give them information – the student can give consent when they apply or at a later date. Student Finance England Contact Phone Number is : +44 (0)141 243 3570 and Address is Student Finance England, PO Box 210 Darlington DL1 9HJ, United Kingdom Student Finance is a Financial Company that works under the England Government and provides Services such as Education loan to Students who want to Study abroad or within the Country.The Company also provides other Financial Services. If a student, or anyone calling on behalf of a student, wants to discuss any detail about their student finance account - they should contact us on the Student Finance England helpline. We can’t give anyone account specific information without the consent of the account holder, find out more about our 'Consent to Share' process before you call. Student Finance England Email Email: [email protected] Telephone: 0300 100 0601 Student Finance England Appeals. An appeal is a formal request to Student Finance England. You can ask them to review a decision about whether you can get financial help and the possible amount. Student Finance England Twitter Facebook. Telephone: 0300 100 0607 Text relay (if you cannot hear or speak on the phone): 18001 then 0300 100 0607 Monday to Friday, 8am to 8pm Saturday and Sunday ...

A rant about Student Finance and Estrangement.

2020.09.09 23:25 zapatos96 A rant about Student Finance and Estrangement.

I'm a student in the UK, and here our government loan is determined by a company called Student Finance England. I've made the decision after over 2 years of being separated from my parents to apply as an independent student, and it has not been easy.
The main issue with SFE is their refusal to acknowledge that estrangement is a broad definition, and each case must be dealt with individually. By their definition, it's 12 months or greater of no contact. That's it. This doesn't consider what this contact actually is, the nature of this contact, whether or not it's healthy, frequency, ANY of those factors. Not only does this completely miss most legitimate cases of estrangement, it insinuates that the only way I'll get my voice heard is by cutting every tie to the extreme. I certainly want to cut ties, believe me, but it's not always this easy. I just want students such as myself who's experience lie in this gray area of estrangement to be recognized as the independents that we are.
My application has been a rocky one, as my mother and father will contact me in an emotionally manipulative way. It's taken hours to convince various customer representatives, having to open up about my experiences to multiple strangers, just to make a slither of progress. The part that irks me most is the method of assessment. Their "assessment" was a 5 minute phone call, with a customer service representative telling me how I am and what my experiences were like, based off of 1 document I supplied to them. An assessment should be an open conversation with a member of staff trained in mental health and family estrangement, so that students a) don't have to open up to multiple strangers but instead one trained counselor and b) a proper evaluation of the estrangement can be made. I've sent an email of complaint, but I have no idea how long it will take to process this, and I just want to express that this process has hurt me.
This entire process has just made me doubt what I went through, and I feel like my complaints aren't valid. It takes a lot of work to reassure myself, but I know that what I experienced was neglect and emotional abuse, and I'm damn well worthy of complaining.
Thanks for reading, just really needed to get this off of my chest.
submitted by zapatos96 to EstrangedAdultChild [link] [comments]


2020.09.08 02:41 massivekaren Can someone advise me on how to find out if I’m PAYE or self employed and how to proceed?

Hi. Please don’t judge my multiple mistakes, I’m 22F and just an idiot really.
I went PT with my work in Jan, decided to pick up a second job. Applied at a care agency that had just started and got given the job on the spot. They didn’t interview me, they sent off for my DBS but I never received it so I don’t think they did and they made me sign a contract however never gave me a copy of it. This was my first mistake in just readily accepting a random job but I was in need of extra work.
I sent off my payslips each Monday via email and got paid into my bank each Friday. I was never sent a payslip or anything of the sort but I got money each week so didn’t think about it.
I finished studying and decided to go FT at my original job again and quit this agency in June. They took my resignation and I never heard from them again.
Student Finance England asked me for 3 years of wage slips and my P45 in order to assess my income for my student loan so I emailed the company asking for a copy of my contract, my P45 and my wage slips stating why I needed them. They did not reply.
I logged into my HMRC account the other day and from looking at it I’ve noticed that this job isn’t listed on my account. It doesn’t look like I’ve paid any tax from this company myself but I’m still paying tax from my first job and have a split tax code still currently.
I am unsure whether I am a PAYE employee or Self employed. I met my bosses in person when I went for the job but never actually saw them again. They never mentioned PAYE or self employment and I guess it was wrong of me to just assume I was PAYE. If I did count as self employed then I owe a lot of tax but if I’m a PAYE then I think the company might be dodgy. I emailed three weeks ago stating again, I need my contract (which I’m hoping will tell me if I was PAYE or umbrella), P45 and a copy of my wage slips. I also this time added that I must receive these by the start of September as I start uni this month and need to sort my loans.
They did not respond. I have called both company directors who oversee everything but neither call actually rings. I’ve called their office multiple times but the phone just continuously rings and I think they are both working from home due to the pandemic which I don’t have either’s home addresses.
I’ve messaged a couple of old colleagues about this who replied instantly when I started the conversation, but both stopped replying when I asked if they were self employed or PAYE and have they ever received wage slips or contracts.
I’m not too stressed about student finance, I’ll just work extra hours at my original job until I can sort my loan however I am really worried about my tax situation. I don’t want to go directly to HMRC because I’m unsure who’s in the wrong here and I currently don’t have enough money to pay a hefty tax bill if I’m at fault.
I worked anything between 15-50 hours a week so definitely should be paying tax. I always assumed my tax was automatically deducted because I’d get paid £10.50 p/h but sometimes would get my pay and it would £121.36 like very random pennies??
So my questions are:
  1. I had a 0 hours contract working 15-50 hours per week. I was employed by a company and sent to cover staff shortages in care homes. Am I even entitled to a P45?
  2. Am I PAYE or am I self employed? Probably unanswerable but worth a shot.
  3. Is it still at all possible to obtain my contract or wage slips or am I done for in this area?
  4. Is it legal to allow me to start working whilst waiting for a new DBS check when I never actually heard anything back about my DBS nor received a certificate?
  5. If I am self employed and do owe tax, can I pay it off monthly? Will I get in trouble?
  6. If this company never told HMRC I was employed and I haven’t worked there since June, why am I still on a shared tax code?
Thanks in advance, any help is appreciated!
submitted by massivekaren to legaladviceofftopic [link] [comments]


2020.09.07 22:11 weirdbritishchic My university is asking me to repay money I didn’t receive?

Also posted on financial
I am in England.
Due to corona, I got to leave me Student halls early. Everyone there got a refund of their deposit. I got a little bit extra due to some flood damage in my flat.
Since paying the deposit, I closed my bank account with Nationwide and opened another account with a different provider.
I emailed the finance team when I heard about the refunds in order to make sure they sent it to my new account. The asked me to fill in a form and return it, which I did, and they emailed me confirmation of receipt.
When it came time for refunds I received an email saying it had been refunded to “your card”. I quickly emailed thanking them but checking it was refunded to my new bank details like I had specified.
I received an email back stating it had been refunded to my payment card ending **** which was the card on my closed account.
I emailed back to tell them once again the account was closed and I had contacted them about this prior.
I received a BACS to my new account with the money while we waited for the bank to return it to them. Nationwide never returned the payment to them.
I received an email saying their payment company had confirmed the payment was authorised and that I now had to pay them back the “duplicate” refund.
I replied informing them it was likely in a holding account and told them exactly how to claim this back, as my father worked in finance for 10+ years and has handled these situations before.
They ignored me and again reiterated that the payment was successful.
I emailed back asking to speak to someone higher up who might have dealt with this situation before.
As of yet no reply to that.
I just received my email to register for me second year, which is necessary to attend the course and receive my finance, but when I tried to it says I cannot because I have an outstanding balance!
What can I do in this situation? I am desperate. My entire future is on the line because their finance department won’t listen to me.
UPDATE; They’ve removed the debt flag on my account so I have been able to register. Latest update is they are “waiting to hear back from [their] bank”.
submitted by weirdbritishchic to LegalAdviceUK [link] [comments]


2020.09.07 14:15 Ichadds Wondering if I could sue my University

This is in England This is probably gonna be a long one. So I studied a foundation year at university of Sunderland I completed the year and requested to transfer to another Sheffield Hallam University so I can could move in with my girlfriend. When I received my results I sent those to the new uni but was told I need my certificate to prove they’re real. (This was after quite a bit of emailing back and forth). So I contacted the Sunderland uni asking about my certificate and getting a digital copy of it. After about a month of emailing back and forth they said they’re now printing my certificate on Thursday the 10th September. Bearing in mind they’re under the impression that my deadline to hand this in is Monday the 7th September. I was able to get an extension but didn’t tell them this. They plan to to send it either the same day or the next day, it’s not specified, but more than likely I will receive it after my new deadline. If this is the case I will be forced to defer for a year which means I won’t be entitled to student finance which is what would be used to fund my accommodation and my food bills for the year. My gf can’t afford it all alone and I was told that if this is the case I should sue Sunderland university for my rent and food bills for the year. I’m mainly wondering if this is possible and how would I go about it.
submitted by Ichadds to LegalAdviceUK [link] [comments]


2020.09.03 17:54 ukuni180 3 year majors, private bedrooms, social healthcare... I'm the US admissions officer at a top UK university - let's talk about studying in across the pond. AMA.

So I did this last year before the world fell in on itself - I thought it may be useful to resurrect it for those of you who are in the middle of your college applications now. For those of you who saw my last post, I make no apologies for some copying and pasting.
SUPER LONG POST WARNING
TL:DR: I work in UK admissions, ask me anything.
As the title says - I am the lead US admissions officer ("International Officer") for a top UK university. Promise I'm not a corporate shill - I'm just another redditor with a job.
Having seen what US students go through to get into college in the States, I thought I'd throw out some information about studying in the United Kingdom. Hopefully I will be able to dispel some common misconceptions, and give you all something to think about.
Disclaimer: I will be speaking generally about UK admissions. Not everything I say will be applicable to every university (looking at you, Oxbridge) - but should be fairly accurate for most.
The United Kingdom
Geography lesson time - The UK is made up of 4 constituent nations (for now anyway...) - England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. All four have distinct regional personalities, and each has excellent universities. Many US students think that the UK is made up of Oxbridge, London and St. Andrew's. Like the US, there are colleges for students of widely varying academic ability and financial means - please don't think that college is inaccessible to you because of perceptions of your grades and bank account.
UK college structure
The UK has two main college systems: Scotland - 4 year degrees, similar to US model. 2 years of mixed curriculum, followed by 2 years of 'declared major'.
England, Wales, Northern Ireland - 3 year major. Major declared at point of application, no general education - just the subject you want to study.
If you know exactly what you want to study then the 3 year system is great for you - you can dive straight into your subject and ditch the stuff you want to leave behind in high school.
If you're not sure, the Scottish system is actually where the US college system derived from - so it's a much more familiar path.
Rankings
There are various sources for University rankings - the most reliable in the UK are the Times Higher Education, and the Guardian. Please be aware to search by subject specific rankings - your school of choice could be number 10 overall, but number 100 for your major (or vice versa).
The UK has it's version of the Ivy League - called The Russell Group. This is not a strictly accurate comparison. All Russell Group universities are very good, but not all very good universities are in the Russell Group - so take it only as indicative.
The admissions process
UK applications are done through a system called UCAS - which is essentially our Common App. It allows you to apply to up to 5 UK schools with one application, for one fee of £25 (roughly $30).
Your application consists of your high school diploma, test scores, a personal statement and a letter of recommendation.
Every university has different entry requirements - usually published on their website. Generally they will ask for an unweighted CGPA of 3.0/4 or above, either the SAT I or ACT, and 2 or 3 APs or Subject Tests. If you are pursuing a STEM discipline, they will ask for specific scores in specific APs/subject tests (e.g. Bio for Bio majors).
There is a notional application deadline of January 15th (October 15th for Oxbridge, medicine, dentistry) - but in reality we will accept applications all the way through to the summer. Applications will still be open after November 4th, should you discover an urgent need to leave your country...
Some UK universities will also accept the Common App - but UCAS is the preferred option.
The personal statement
This is quite different from a US college essay. For one, the same personal statement goes to all 5 colleges. This is indicative of the main difference between UK and US admissions is that UK admissions are purely merit-based and subject specific. We want to know if you're smart enough, and interested in your subject area.
To that end, your personal statement should be geared towards your subject, and nothing else. Extra-curriculars are valuable only where they have either direct relevance to your major, or demonstrate useful transferable skills. Loads more advice is available on the UCAS website.
Things we do not care about:
That's not to be harsh - we just want to ensure that offers are given to the most capable students, simply because they are capable.
We don't want or need a fine piece of prose or a lovely story about your instagram non-profits. Tell us what you know about your major, and why you'll be good at it.
Tuition
Generally, the better ranked the University, the more expensive - but this has regional variation. However, all colleges in the UK (with one or two exceptions) are public universities - so prices will not be the eye-watering amounts expected at top US colleges. Generally tuition ranges from around £15,000 - £30,000 per year, before scholarships and discounts.
Living costs
Vary wildly across the UK. London and the South of England (Oxbridge) are expensive. Think Bay Area/Manhattan expensive.
Other areas are much less so - Northern Ireland, Wales, North of England and Scotland (not Edinburgh) are much more affordable, and super high quality of life.
Housing
Every decent university will have guaranteed housing for international students. There is no room sharing in the UK - you will have your own bedroom, and usually your own en-suite bathroom. Having a stranger sleep next to you is a bizarre concept to Brits. It is generally of a very high quality - like living in a medium rate hotel.
Other costs
Outside of tuition and housing, we don't expect you to pay for much. There are no book fees - we have libraries for that. Borrow books, for free. If you desperately want to buy a book, they are like £50-£60. No access codes for classes or any of that rubbish.
Finance
You can apply US student loans (FAFSA) to study at most universities in the UK, exactly the same way as you would in the US. You just need to borrow a lot less because tuition and living are way cheaper here, and it's only 3 year majors for the most part
Healthcare
We have social healthcare in the UK. You will pay a health surcharge as part of your visa application which costs £300 ($400) per year. That covers all medical treatment you will ever need in the UK, including routine medication, pre-existing conditions, ER, ambulances - whatever. It's all free.
Student life
There is no greek life. Organised fun is not very British/Scottish/Northern Irish/whatever. We have hundreds of student societies which are organised around interest groups - everything from debating to video games to veganism to The Earl Grey Tea society (??). Social life is very good at UK universities, it's just a bit... different.
The drinking age in the UK is 18. Do with that information what you will - but you don't need to risk getting arrested to have a good night out.
Safety
The United Kingdom is an incredibly safe country. Guns are illegal - even the police don't carry them. Seriously.
Large cities like London come with the risks of large cities anywhere - petty crime, terrorism. But by and large, I feel much safer walking around at night in the UK than I do in the US. I love your country, but some of your cities are sketchy as hell after dark.
Outside of London/Manchester - cities are pretty great in the UK. Places like Belfast, Newcastle, Edinburgh have superb quality of life for low cost.
We also have rural and small-town campuses. Whatever your preference, there is probably an option for it.
Brexit
The one silver lining of Covid is that no-one asks me about Brexit anymore, but it's a still a thing. Yay for 2020. In short - here's what you need to know. Brexit is a disaster, but its impact on non-EU students is practically non-existant. The UK is still a diverse, thriving, welcoming country.
In reality, Brexit will be very good for US students. For one, the Dollar-Pound exchange rate has tilted about 20% in your favour - so everything is cheaper for you! Also, the UK will be re-introducing the Post Study Work Visa - which will allow graduates to remain in the UK to seek employment for 2 years after graduation. We have a skills gap to fill freshly vacated by our friends in the EU.
THIS SOUNDS GREAT, TELL ME MORE
The best resource is people like me. Every UK university worth its salt will have someone like me whose entire job is to help US students apply. Google the university name and "USA" and you should get to the right info. Email us, we will answer all of the questions. Our admissions is merit based, so you can ask whatever level of stupid question you want, none of it matters!
I'll stop for now. Ask me anything. I'll try and reply as soon as possible. Sorry if I don't reply right away - I have a real job that I have to do - but please feel free to PM me at any point with questions.
For the Mods - my last post was okay-ed by u/admissionsmom - so I'm assuming this one is okay too. Apologies if it isn't!
submitted by ukuni180 to ApplyingToCollege [link] [comments]


2020.08.20 13:44 ukuni180 1 year Masters, no GRE requirement... let's talk about Grad School in the UK. I'm the US Admissions Officer for a Russell Group university in the UK - AMA.

As the title says - I am the lead US admissions officer ("International Officer") for a top UK university.
I started a similar thread yesterday over on gradadmissions, and did one previously on the main undergraduate sub - they seemed to be useful, so I thought I'd throw it in here as well. Apologies for any dual subscribers that are seeing similar things twice.
Hopefully I will be able to dispel some common misconceptions, and give you all something to think about when you're considering your options for Grad School.
Disclaimer: I will be speaking generally about UK admissions. Not everything I say will be applicable to every university (looking at you, Oxbridge) - but should be fairly accurate for most.
The United Kingdom Geography lesson time - The UK is made up of 4 constituent nations (for now anyway...) - England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. All four have distinct regional personalities, and each has excellent universities. Many US students think that the UK is made up of Oxbridge, London, and St. Andrew's. Like the US, there are colleges for students of widely varying academic ability and financial means - please don't think that college is inaccessible to you because of perceptions of your grades and bank account.
Graduate School Structure - first off, a little bit of terminology. Masters level study in the UK is known as postgraduate study, and can be referred to as postgraduate taught study. PhD and Doctoral programs are known as postgraduate research. The vast, vast majority of Masters (MA, MSc, MRes) programs in the UK are 1 year in length, with PhDs typically taking 3 years in addition to that.
Most programs run in 3 semesters - roughly September-December, January-May, June-August. The first two are teaching semesters, where you would attend classes, the final is a research semester, which you use to complete your individual thesis.
Outside of the obvious handful of very elite contenders mentioned above, the UK has a large number of excellent universities. One of the indicators for this is the Russell Group - which is made up of 24 of the UK's research intensive universities. These tend to be older, more prestigious institutions - but don't see the RG as the be all and end all of UK higher education.
Admissions - applying to Masters programs in the UK is very straightforward. Of course there are variations between universities - but here are some common themes: - The GRE is not required, nor any form of standardised test. You've already done a full degree - that was your entrance exam. - Admissions essays - also generally not required, although for some specialist programs they may be. - Statement of purpose - required at the very top end of UK universities, but not for most - Letters of reference - again, not always required. Most UK universities will be content to just take contact details of referees.
Generally speaking, you will just require your undergraduate transcripts. It really is that simple in a lot of places. Our admissions philosophy at all levels is based on academic merit - we don't judge you on where you went to school before, where you've interned, who your parents are or any of that rubbish. We want to know that you're interested and capable.
Application fees Most UK universities will not charge you to apply, although those right at the top of the ladder charge between £25-100 (Pounds Sterling) - mainly to discourage speculative applications. If you find one less highly ranked that is charging you to apply - that's very bad form, and should be seen as a good indicator of what they're hoping to get out of you as an international student.
Tuition Generally, the better ranked the University, the more expensive - but this has regional variation. However, all colleges in the UK (with one or two exceptions) are public universities - so prices will not be the eye-watering amounts expected at top US colleges. Generally tuition ranges from around £15,000 - £30,000 for the one year program, before scholarships and discounts.
Living costs Vary wildly across the UK. London and the South of England (Oxbridge) are expensive. Think Bay Area/Manhattan expensive.
Other areas are much less so - Northern Ireland, Wales, North of England and Scotland (not Edinburgh) are much more affordable, and super high quality of life. There are vibrant, exciting cities, as well as smaller, rural campuses. Probably castles at every one of them. Many of the UK's smaller cities are really student focused - if you wouldn't want to live in Manhattan, you don't want to live in London.
Housing Every decent university will have guaranteed housing for international students. There is no room sharing in the UK - you will have your own bedroom, and usually your own en-suite bathroom. Having a stranger sleep next to you is a bizarre concept to Brits. It is generally of a very high quality - like living in a medium rate hotel.
Other costs Outside of tuition and housing, we don't expect you to pay for much. There are no book fees - we have libraries for that. Borrow books, for free. If you desperately want to buy a book, they are like £50-£60. No access codes for classes or any of that rubbish.
Finance You can apply US student loans (FAFSA) to study at most universities in the UK, exactly the same way as you would in the US. You just need to borrow a lot less because tuition and living are way cheaper here, and it's only a 1 year program!
Scholarships Most UK universities will offer some form of scholarships, but they will likely only cover a small proportion of the tuition fees. As I mentioned above, we're pretty much all public institutions, so we don't make a huge profit off your tuition - as such, we don't have the financial leeway to offer large financial aid packages. Hopefully the lower fees, lower living costs and shorter degrees make up for that.
Work If you're coming on a non-UK/Irish passport, you will be required to get a Tier 4 Student Visa. Under the terms of this visa, you can work up to 20 hours per week during semesters, with no limit on your hours during holidays.
Healthcare We have social healthcare in the UK. You will pay a health surcharge as part of your visa application which costs £300 ($400) per year. That covers all medical treatment you will ever need in the UK, including routine medication, pre-existing conditions, ER, ambulances - whatever. It's all free. Same goes for all the coronavirus stuff - testing, treatment, whatever. All free.
Student life There is no greek life. Organised fun is not very British/Scottish/Northern Irish/whatever. We have hundreds of student societies which are organised around interest groups - everything from debating to video games to veganism to The Earl Grey Tea society (??). Social life is very good at UK universities, it's just a bit... different. Graduate students are welcome to get involved in all of that.
Sport We don't have the NCAA here, so if you were an athlete at undergrad and your eligibility has expired, you can play on in the UK while you get your Masters degree. Please PM me if this is of interest to you - athletic recruitment is my background, so I know this stuff inside out. Athletic scholarships are available at any good UK university.
Safety The United Kingdom is an incredibly safe country. Guns are illegal - even the police don't carry them. Seriously.
Large cities like London come with the risks of large cities anywhere - petty crime, terrorism. But by and large, I feel much safer walking around at night in the UK than I do in the US. I love your country, but some of your cities are sketchy as hell after dark.
Outside of London/Manchester - cities are pretty great in the UK. Places like Belfast, Newcastle, Edinburgh have superb quality of life for low cost.
We also have rural and small-town campuses. Whatever your preference, there is probably an option for it.
Brexit Pre-Covid-19 this was all anyone asked me about, so I should probably touch on it. In short - here's what you need to know. Brexit is a disaster, but its impact on non-EU students is practically non-existant. The UK is still a diverse, thriving, welcoming country.
In reality, Brexit will be very good for US students. For one, the Dollar-Pound exchange rate has tilted about 20% in your favour - so everything is cheaper for you! Also, the UK will be re-introducing the Post Study Work Visa - which will allow graduates to remain in the UK to seek employment for 2 years after graduation. We have a skills gap to fill freshly vacated by our friends in the EU.
THIS SOUNDS GREAT, TELL ME MORE The best resource is people like me. Every UK university worth its salt will have someone like me whose entire job is to help US students apply. Google the university name and "USA" and you should get to the right info. Email us, we will answer all of the questions. Our admissions is merit based, so you can ask whatever level of stupid question you want, none of it matters!
I will be as active on this sub as my working time allows. Things are a little busy right now, as you can imagine, but I'm working from home for the forseeable future - so drop a comment or DM me if you need advice about applying to or studying in the UK.
It should go without saying, but this advice is of course free, and I'll do my best to be impartial - but I have a natural bias towards my own city and college! Also, I can't speak to the intrinsic detail of different university admissions offices, but happy to point you in the right direction.
submitted by ukuni180 to GradSchool [link] [comments]


2020.08.19 12:16 ukuni180 1 year Masters, no GRE requirement... let's talk about Grad School in the UK. I'm the US Admissions Officer for a Russell Group university in the UK - AMA.

As the title says - I am the lead US admissions officer ("International Officer") for a top UK university.
Hopefully I will be able to dispel some common misconceptions, and give you all something to think about when you're considering your options for Grad School.
I did something similar to this a while back in the main undergraduate applications subreddit and folks there found it useful, so I thought I would do the same here.
Disclaimer: I will be speaking generally about UK admissions. Not everything I say will be applicable to every university (looking at you, Oxbridge) - but should be fairly accurate for most.
The United Kingdom Geography lesson time - The UK is made up of 4 constituent nations (for now anyway...) - England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. All four have distinct regional personalities, and each has excellent universities. Many US students think that the UK is made up of Oxbridge, London, and St. Andrew's. Like the US, there are colleges for students of widely varying academic ability and financial means - please don't think that college is inaccessible to you because of perceptions of your grades and bank account.
Graduate School Structure - first off, a little bit of terminology. Masters level study in the UK is known as postgraduate study, and can be referred to as postgraduate taught study. PhD and Doctoral programs are known as postgraduate research. The vast, vast majority of Masters (MA, MSc, MRes) programs in the UK are 1 year in length, with PhDs typically taking 3 years in addition to that.
Most programs run in 3 semesters - roughly September-December, January-May, June-August. The first two are teaching semesters, where you would attend classes, the final is a research semester, which you use to complete your individual thesis.
Outside of the obvious handful of very elite contenders mentioned above, the UK has a large number of excellent universities. One of the indicators for this is the Russell Group - which is made up of 24 of the UK's research intensive universities. These tend to be older, more prestigious institutions - but don't see the RG as the be all and end all of UK higher education.
Admissions - applying to Masters programs in the UK is very straightforward. Of course there are variations between universities - but here are some common themes: - The GRE is not required, nor any form of standardised test. You've already done a full degree - that was your entrance exam. - Admissions essays - also generally not required, although for some specialist programs they may be. - Statement of purpose - required at the very top end of UK universities, but not for most - Letters of reference - again, not always required. Most UK universities will be content to just take contact details of referees.
Generally speaking, you will just require your undergraduate transcripts. It really is that simple in a lot of places. Our admissions philosophy at all levels is based on academic merit - we don't judge you on where you went to school before, where you've interned, who your parents are or any of that rubbish. We want to know that you're interested and capable.
Applications are free UK universities will not charge you to apply. If you find one that is charging you to apply - that's very bad form, and should be seen as a good indicator of what they're hoping to get out of you as an international student.
Tuition Generally, the better ranked the University, the more expensive - but this has regional variation. However, all colleges in the UK (with one or two exceptions) are public universities - so prices will not be the eye-watering amounts expected at top US colleges. Generally tuition ranges from around £15,000 - £30,000 for the one year program, before scholarships and discounts.
Living costs Vary wildly across the UK. London and the South of England (Oxbridge) are expensive. Think Bay Area/Manhattan expensive.
Other areas are much less so - Northern Ireland, Wales, North of England and Scotland (not Edinburgh) are much more affordable, and super high quality of life. There are vibrant, exciting cities, as well as smaller, rural campuses. Probably castles at every one of them. Many of the UK's smaller cities are really student focused - if you wouldn't want to live in Manhattan, you don't want to live in London.
Housing Every decent university will have guaranteed housing for international students. There is no room sharing in the UK - you will have your own bedroom, and usually your own en-suite bathroom. Having a stranger sleep next to you is a bizarre concept to Brits. It is generally of a very high quality - like living in a medium rate hotel.
Other costs Outside of tuition and housing, we don't expect you to pay for much. There are no book fees - we have libraries for that. Borrow books, for free. If you desperately want to buy a book, they are like £50-£60. No access codes for classes or any of that rubbish.
Finance You can apply US student loans (FAFSA) to study at most universities in the UK, exactly the same way as you would in the US. You just need to borrow a lot less because tuition and living are way cheaper here, and it's only a 1 year program!
Scholarships Most UK universities will offer some form of scholarships, but they will likely only cover a small proportion of the tuition fees. As I mentioned above, we're pretty much all public institutions, so we don't make a huge profit off your tuition - as such, we don't have the financial leeway to offer large financial aid packages. Hopefully the lower fees, lower living costs and shorter degrees make up for that.
Work If you're coming on a non-UK/Irish passport, you will be required to get a Tier 4 Student Visa. Under the terms of this visa, you can work up to 20 hours per week during semesters, with no limit on your hours during holidays.
Healthcare We have social healthcare in the UK. You will pay a health surcharge as part of your visa application which costs £300 ($400) per year. That covers all medical treatment you will ever need in the UK, including routine medication, pre-existing conditions, ER, ambulances - whatever. It's all free. Same goes for all the coronavirus stuff - testing, treatment, whatever. All free.
Student life There is no greek life. Organised fun is not very British/Scottish/Northern Irish/whatever. We have hundreds of student societies which are organised around interest groups - everything from debating to video games to veganism to The Earl Grey Tea society (??). Social life is very good at UK universities, it's just a bit... different. Graduate students are welcome to get involved in all of that.
Sport We don't have the NCAA here, so if you were an athlete at undergrad and your eligibility has expired, you can play on in the UK while you get your Masters degree. Please PM me if this is of interest to you - athletic recruitment is my background, so I know this stuff inside out. Athletic scholarships are available at any good UK university.
Safety The United Kingdom is an incredibly safe country. Guns are illegal - even the police don't carry them. Seriously.
Large cities like London come with the risks of large cities anywhere - petty crime, terrorism. But by and large, I feel much safer walking around at night in the UK than I do in the US. I love your country, but some of your cities are sketchy as hell after dark.
Outside of London/Manchester - cities are pretty great in the UK. Places like Belfast, Newcastle, Edinburgh have superb quality of life for low cost.
We also have rural and small-town campuses. Whatever your preference, there is probably an option for it.
Brexit Pre-Covid-19 this was all anyone asked me about, so I should probably touch on it. In short - here's what you need to know. Brexit is a disaster, but its impact on non-EU students is practically non-existant. The UK is still a diverse, thriving, welcoming country.
In reality, Brexit will be very good for US students. For one, the Dollar-Pound exchange rate has tilted about 20% in your favour - so everything is cheaper for you! Also, the UK will be re-introducing the Post Study Work Visa - which will allow graduates to remain in the UK to seek employment for 2 years after graduation. We have a skills gap to fill freshly vacated by our friends in the EU.
THIS SOUNDS GREAT, TELL ME MORE The best resource is people like me. Every UK university worth its salt will have someone like me whose entire job is to help US students apply. Google the university name and "USA" and you should get to the right info. Email us, we will answer all of the questions. Our admissions is merit based, so you can ask whatever level of stupid question you want, none of it matters!
I will be as active on this sub as my working time allows. Things are a little busy right now, as you can imagine, but I'm working from home for the forseeable future - so drop a comment or DM me if you need advice about applying to or studying in the UK.
It should go without saying, but this advice is of course free, and I'll do my best to be impartial - but I have a natural bias towards my own city and college! Also, I can't speak to the intrinsic detail of different university admissions offices, but happy to point you in the right direction.
submitted by ukuni180 to gradadmissions [link] [comments]


2020.08.12 23:03 Material777 Where to enter Student Finance England reference number?

Hi everyone!
Sorry if this is a really basic question, but I've searched around and can't find the answer, and the chat support is currently closed.
I've enrolled for my first OU module starting this October, and was told in one of my welcome emails to provide the OU with my Student Finance customer reference number as soon as I have it.
I've just checked my Student Finance England account online and it now says my status is 'payments scheduled' (which I guess means everything is confirmed and good to go?)
However, I cannot find anywhere to enter my customer reference number on my OU student account pages. I'm assuming once I do so, the OU will be able to see that the payments are scheduled and I'm all good to go?
Thanks so much in advance to anyone who can help!
submitted by Material777 to OpenUniversity [link] [comments]


2020.08.11 16:46 _silvxr Student Finance and Settled Status

Hi all! Sorry this is a bit of a long one! I applied for a tuition fee loan in June as I want to start an English Lit degree with the Open University. I contacted Student Finance England via Twitter to ask why my application is taking so long. They’re asking if I received an email in July about proving my residency in the UK which I did not ☹️ and I didn’t get any alert on the website to provide anything other than my passport which has already been processed. They’re asking me for residency proof between 01/09/2015-01/01/2016 which I don’t have any proof of as I left sixth form due to having depression and suicidal thoughts and I didn’t get a job until 2017. On the website it says that to be eligible I need to have Settled Status (which I do) and to have lived in the UK 3 years before the course starts (this I can prove). I have lived in the UK for 13 years now and can prove all those years apart from the time period in which I was depressed. I also don’t understand why they need 5 years of proof even though on the website it says 3. Has anyone dealt with a situation like this? Any help would be appreciated. I’m stressing out that I won’t be able to get the loan and studying this degree means so much to me.
submitted by _silvxr to OpenUniversity [link] [comments]


2020.08.01 22:39 bookseller10 Mega eTextbooks release thread (part-31)! Find your textbooks here between $5-$25 :)

Please find the list below:
  1. Davis's Drug Guide for Nurses, 15th Edition: April Hazard Vallerand & Cynthia A Sanoski & Judith Hopfer Deglin
  2. Pediatric Dentistry: Infancy through Adolescence, 6th Edition: Arthur Nowak & John R. Christensen & Tad R. Mabry & Janice Alisa Townsend & Martha H. Wells
  3. Macroeconomics: Principles, Applications, and Tools, 8th Edition: Arthur O'Sullivan & Steven Sheffrin & Stephen Perez
  4. Crafting & Executing Strategy: The Quest for Competitive Advantage: Concepts and Cases, 20th Edition: Arthur Thompson & Margaret Peteraf & John Gamble & A. Strickland
  5. Kozier & Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing, 10th Edition: Audrey T. Berman & Shirlee Snyder & Geralyn Frandsen
  6. Pickard's Guide to Minimally Invasive Operative Dentistry, 10th Edition: Avit Banerjee & Timothy F. Watson
  7. Retail Management, Global Edition, 13th Edition: Joel R. Evans & Patrali M. Chatterjee & Barry R. Berman
  8. The Pancreas: An Integrated Textbook of Basic Science, Medicine, and Surgery, 3rd Edition: Hans G. Beger & Andrew L. Warshaw & Ralph H. Hruban & Markus W. Buchler & Markus M. Lerch & John P. Neoptolemos & Tooru Shimosegawa & David C. Whitcomb
  9. Principles of Accounting, 12th Edition: Belverd E. Needles & Marian Powers & Susan V. Crosson
  10. Principles of Accounting, 11th Edition: Belverd E. Needles & Marian Powers & Susan V. Crosson
  11. Genetics Essentials: Concepts and Connections, 3rd Edition: Benjamin A. Pierce
  12. Genetics: A Conceptual Approach, 6th Edition: Benjamin A. Pierce
  13. We the People, Essentials 11th Edition: Benjamin Ginsberg & Theodore J. Lowi & Caroline J. Tolbert & Margaret Weir
  14. We the People, Core 11th Edition: Benjamin Ginsberg & Theodore J. Lowi & Caroline J. Tolbert & Margaret Weir
  15. Renewable Energy: Physics, Engineering, Environmental Impacts, Economics and Planning, 5th Edition: Bent Sørensen
  16. Qualitative Research Methods for the Social Sciences, Global Edition, 9th Edition: Howard Lune & Bruce L. Berg
  17. Fundamentals of Biostatistics, 8th Edition: Bernard Rosner
  18. Basic and Clinical Pharmacology, 14th Edition: Bertram Katzung
  19. Integrated Science, 6th Edition: Bill Tillery & Eldon Enger & Frederick Ross
  20. Physical Science, 11th Edition: Bill Tillery & Stephanie J. Slater & Timothy F. Slater
  21. The Johns Hopkins Internal Medicine Board Review: Certification and Recertification, 5th Edition: Bimal Ashar & Redonda Miller & Stephen Sisson & Johns Hopkins
  22. Large Animal Internal Medicine, 5th Edition: Bradford P. Smith
  23. Calculus: Single Variable, 7th Edition: Deborah Hughes-Hallett & William G. McCallum & Andrew M. Gleason
  24. McGraw-Hill's Taxation of Individuals and Business Entities, 10th Edition: Brian Spilker & Benjamin Ayers & John Barrick & Edmund Outslay
  25. Writing and Editing for Digital Media, 3rd Edition: Brian Carroll
  26. Ecology of Freshwaters: Earth's Bloodstream, 5th Edition: Brian R. Moss
  27. Anatomy and Physiology Coloring Workbook: A Complete Study Guide, Global Edition, 12th Edition: Elaine N. Marieb & Simone Brito
  28. Essential Cell Biology, 4th Edition: Bruce Alberts & Dennis Bray & Karen Hopkin & Alexander D Johnson & Julian Lewis & Martin Raff & Keith Roberts & Peter Walter
  29. Harrisons Manual of Oncology, 2nd Edition: Bruce Chabner & Thomas Lynch & Dan Longo
  30. Black's Law Dictionary, Abridged, 9th Edition: Bryan A. Garner
  31. Black's Law Dictionary, Standard, 9th Edition: Bryan A. Garner
  32. Chemistry, 4th Edition: Julia Burdge
  33. Hole's Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology, 13th Edition: David Shier & Jackie Butler & Ricki Lewis
  34. Van De Graaff's Photographic Atlas for the Biology Laboratory, 7th Edition: Byron J. Adams & John L. Crawley
  35. Contemporary Implant Dentistry, 3rd Edition: Carl E. Misch
  36. Financial Accounting, 12th Edition: Carl S Warren & James M Reeve & Jonathan Duchac
  37. Statistics for Business and Economics: Global Edition, 11th Edition: Paul Newbold & William Carlson & Betty Thorne
  38. Anatomy: A Regional Atlas of the Human Body, 6th Edition: Carmine D. Clemente
  39. Clemente's Anatomy Dissector, 3rd Edition: Carmine D. Clemente
  40. Fundamentals of Nursing: The Art and Science of Nursing Care, 7th Edition: Carol R. Taylor
  41. Private Security and the Law, 5th Edition: Charles P. Nemeth
  42. Human Resource Management in a Hospitality ,1st Edition: Jerald Chesser
  43. The Chicano Experience: An Alternative Perspective: Alfredo Mirandé
  44. Nuclear Physics of Stars, 2nd Edition: Christian Iliadis
  45. International Human Resource Management, 4th Edition: Christopher Brewster & Elizabeth Houldsworth & Paul Sparrow & Guy Vernon
  46. Social Engineering: The Science of Human Hacking, 2nd Edition: Christopher Hadnagy
  47. Psychology, 5th Edition, Global Edition: Saundra K. Ciccarelli & J. Noland White
  48. Seeley's Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, 9th Edition: Cinnamon VanPutte & Jennifer Regan & Andrew Russo
  49. Mass Media Law, 20th Edition: Clay Calvert & Dan V. Kozlowski & Derigan Silver
  50. Handbook of Methods in Aquatic Microbial Ecology, 1st Edition: Paul F. Kemp & Jonathan J. Cole & Barry F. Sherr & Evelyn B. Sherr
  51. Gray Hat Hacking: The Ethical Hacker's Handbook, 5th Edition: Allen Harper & Daniel Regalado & Ryan Linn & Stephen Sims & Branko Spasojevic & Linda Martinez & Michael Baucom & Chris Eagle & Shon Harris
  52. Heinemann Physics 12, 4th Edition: Doug Bail & Greg Moran & Keith Burrows & Rob Chapman & Ann Conibear & Carmel Fry
  53. Nursing2018 Drug Handbook, 38th Edition: Lippincott
  54. College Algebra: Concepts Through Functions, 4th Edition: Michael Sullivan & Michael Sullivan III
  55. Concepts in Strategic Management and Business Policy: Globalization, Innovation and Sustainability, 15th Edition: Thomas L. Wheelen & J. David Hunger & Alan N. Hoffman & Charles E. Bamford
  56. Master the Boards USMLE Step 2 CK, 4th Edition: Conrad Fischer
  57. Master the Boards USMLE Step 3, 5th Edition: Conrad Fischer
  58. Criminological and Forensic Psychology, 2nd Edition: Helen Gavin
  59. Cultural Anthropology, 15th Edition: Carol R. Ember & Melvin Ember
  60. Concepts of Genetics, Global Edition, 11th Edition: Michael A. Palladino & Charlotte A. Spencer & Michael R. Cummings & William S. Klug
  61. Marketing Research, Global Edition, 8th Edition: D Pati
  62. Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology, 1st Edition: D.B.A. Mehdi Khosrow-Pour
  63. No B.S. Direct Marketing: The Ultimate No Holds Barred Kick Butt Take No Prisoners Direct Marketing for Non-Direct Marketing Businesses, 3rd Edition: Dan S. Kennedy
  64. Horngren's Cost Accounting: A Managerial Emphasis, Global Edition, 16th Edition: Srikant M. Datar & Madhav V. Rajan
  65. Fundamental Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences, 8th Edition: David C. Howell
  66. Encyclopedia of School Health, 1st Edition: David C. Wiley & Amy C. Cory
  67. Myers' Psychology for AP®, 2nd Edition: David G. Myers
  68. Exploring Psychology, 10th Edition: David G. Myers & C. Nathan DeWall
  69. Psychology, 11th Edition: David C. Myers & C. Nathan DeWall
  70. An Introduction to Cognitive Psychology: Processes and disorders, 3rd Edition: David Groome
  71. Fundamentals of Physics, 10th Edition: David Halliday & Robert Resnick & Jearl Walker
  72. McMinn's Concise Human Anatomy, 2nd Edition: David Heylings & Stephen W. Carmichael & Samuel John Leinster & Janak Saada
  73. Cardiac Intensive Care, 3rd Edition: David L. Brown
  74. Jekel's Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Preventive Medicine, 4th Edition: David L. Katz & Joann G. Elmore & Dorothea Wild & Sean C Lucan
  75. Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry, 7th Edition: David L. Nelson & Michael M. Cox
  76. Anesthesiology, 3rd Edition: David E. Longnecker & Mark F. Newman & Warren M. Zapol & Warren Sandberg & Sean Mackey
  77. Real Estate Principles: A Value Approach, 5th Edition: David Ling & Wayne Archer
  78. The Practice of Statistics for Business and Economics, 4th Edition: Layth C. Alwan & Bruce A. Craig
  79. Employment Law for Business, 9th Edition: Dawn Bennett-Alexander & Laura Hartman
  80. McDonald and Avery's Dentistry for the Child and Adolescent, 10th Edition: Jeffrey A. Dean
  81. Modern Blood Banking & Transfusion Practices, 6th Edition: Denise M. Harmening
  82. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Edition: Dennis L. Kasper & Anthony S. Fauci & Stephen L. Hauser & Dan L. Longo & J. Larry Jameson & Joseph Loscalzo
  83. Public Relations: Strategies and Tactics, Global Edition, 11th Edition: Dennis L. Wilcox & Glen T. Cameron & Bryan H. Reber
  84. A Pocket Style Manual, APA Version, 7th Edition: Diana Hacker & Nancy Sommers
  85. Physical Geology: Earth Revealed, 9th Edition: Diane Carlson & Charles Plummer
  86. Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology, 4th Edition: Donald C Rizzo
  87. Intermediate Accounting, 16th Edition: Donald E. Kieso & Jerry J. Weygandt & Terry D. Warfield
  88. Fundamentals of Biochemistry: Life at the Molecular Level, 5th Edition: Donald Voet & Judith G. Voet & Charlotte W. Pratt
  89. Medical-Surgical Nursing: Concepts for Interprofessional Collaborative Care, Single Volume, 9th Edition: Donna D. Ignatavicius & M. Linda Workman & Cherie Rebar
  90. Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers, 6th Edition: Douglas C. Montgomery & George C. Runger
  91. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 11th Edition: Douglas P. Zipes & Peter Libby & Robert O. Bonow & Douglas L. Mann & Gordon F. Tomaselli
  92. Rock Slope Engineering: Civil Applications, 5th Edition: Duncan C. Wyllie
  93. Earth: An Introduction to Physical Geology, 11th Edition: Edward J. Tarbuck & Frederick K. Lutgens & Dennis G. Tasa
  94. Earth Science, 14th Edition: Edward J. Tarbuck & Frederick K. Lutgens & Dennis G. Tasa
  95. Applications and Investigations in Earth Science, 8th Edition: Edward J. Tarbuck & Frederick K. Lutgens & Dennis G. Tasa & Kenneth G. Pinzke
  96. Cunningham and Gilstrap's Operative Obstetrics, 3rd Edition: Edward R. Yeomans & Barbara L. Hoffman & Larry C. Gilstrap & F. Gary Cunningham
  97. International Human Resource Management: Globalization, National Systems and Multinational Companies, New edition: Tony Edwards & Chris Rees
  98. Anatomy and Physiology Coloring Workbook: A Complete Study Guide, 12th Edition: Elaine N. Marieb & Simone Brito
  99. Human Anatomy, 8th Edition, Global Edition: Marieb Elaine & Wilhelm Patricia Brady & Mallatt Jon B.
  100. Intermediate Accounting, 2nd Edition: Elizabeth A. Gordon & Jana S. Raedy & Alexander J. Sannella
  101. Concepts in Enterprise Resource Planning, 4th Edition: Ellen Monk & Bret Wagner
  102. Social Psychology, 9th Edition: Elliot Aronson & Timothy D. Wilson & Robin M. Akert & Samuel R. Sommers
  103. Abnormal Child Psychology, 6th Edition: Eric J Mash & David A Wolfe
  104. Python Crash Course: A Hands-On, Project-Based Introduction to Programming, 1st Edition: Eric Matthes
  105. Essentials of Cultural Anthropology: A Toolkit for a Global Age, 1st Edition: Kenneth J. Guest
  106. Intermediate Financial Management, 13th Edition: Eugene F. Brigham & Phillip R. Daves
  107. Fundamentals of Financial Management, Concise Edition, 9th Edition: Eugene F. Brigham & Joel F. Houston
  108. Operations and Supply Chain Management, 15th Edition: F. Robert Jacobs & Richard Chase
  109. Fundamentals of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 3rd Edition: J. Kenneth Shultis & Richard E. Faw
  110. Compound Semiconductors: Physics, Technology, and Device Concepts, 1st Edition: Ferdinand Scholz
  111. Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not, 1st Edition: Florence Nightingale
  112. Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies, 13th Edition: Frances Sizer & Ellie Whitney
  113. Anatomy, Physiology, & Pathology Complementary Therapists Level 2 and 3, 3rd Edition: Francesca Gould
  114. Organic Chemistry, 10th Edition: Francis Carey & Robert Giuliano
  115. Customer Relationship Management: Concepts and Technologies, 3rd Edition: Francis Buttle & Stan Maklan
  116. An Introduction to Intercultural Communication: Identities in a Global Community, 9th Edition: Fred E. Jandt
  117. Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology, 7th Edition: Frederic H. Martini & Edwin F. Bartholomew
  118. The Atmosphere: An Introduction to Meteorology, 13th Edition: Lutgens Frederick K & Tarbuck Edward J. & Tasa Dennis G.
  119. Foundations of Earth Science, 8th Edition: Frederick K. Lutgens & Edward J. Tarbuck & Dennis G. Tasa
  120. Essentials of Contemporary Management, 6th Edition: Gareth Jones & Jennifer George
  121. Rereading America: Cultural Contexts for Critical Thinking and Writing, 9th Edition: Gary Colombo & Robert Cullen & Bonnie Lisle
  122. Human Resource Management, 15th Edition: Gary Dessler
  123. Electronic Commerce, 12th Edition: Gary Schneider
  124. Color Atlas of Veterinary Ophthalmology, 2nd Edition: Kirk N. Gelatt & Caryn E. Plummer
  125. Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry, 6th Edition: Geoff Rayner-Canham & Tina Overton
  126. Thomas' Calculus in SI Units, 13th Edition: George Thomas
  127. Essentials of Marketing Management, 2nd Edition: Geoffrey Lancaster & Lester Massingham
  128. "They Say / I Say": The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing, with 2016 MLA Update, 3rd Edition: Gerald Graff & Cathy Birkenstein
  129. Matching Supply with Demand: An Introduction to Operations Management, 3rd Edition: Gerard Cachon & Christian Terwiesch
  130. Microbiology: An Introduction, 13th Edition: Gerard J. Tortora & Berdell R. Funke & Christine L. Case & Derek Weber & Warner Bair
  131. Pediatric Dentistry: A Clinical Approach, 3rd Edition: Goran Koch & Sven Poulsen & Ivar Espelid & Dorte Haubek
  132. Wardlaw's Contemporary Nutrition: A Functional Approach, 5th Edition: Anne Smith & Angela Collene & Colleen Spees
  133. Calculus with Applications, Global Edition, 11th Edition: Margaret L. Lial & Raymond N. Greenwell & Nathan P. Ritchey
  134. History of Modern Art, 7th Edition: H. H. Arnason & Elizabeth C. Mansfield
  135. Torrington: Human Resource Management_p10, 10th New edition: Laura Hall & Carol Atkinson & Stephen Taylor & Derek Torrington
  136. Industrial Organic Chemicals, 3rd Edition: Harold A. Wittcoff & Bryan G. Reuben & Jeffery S. Plotkin
  137. Introduction to Logic, 3rd Edition: Harry J Gensler
  138. Coparenting: A Conceptual and Clinical Examination of Family Systems, 1st Edition: James P. McHale & Kristin M. Lindahl
  139. Healthcare Quality Management: A Case Study Approach, 1st Edition: Zachary Pruitt & Candace Smith & Eddie Perez-Ruberte
  140. Fundamentals of Gas Lift Engineering: Well Design and Troubleshooting, 1st Edition: Ali Hernandez
  141. A Visual Guide to Stata Graphics, 3rd Edition: Michael N. Mitchell
  142. HESI Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN Examination, 4th Edition: HESI
  143. HESI Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN Examination, 5th Edition: HESI
  144. The Law of Security and Title-Based Financing, 3rd Edition: Hugh Beale & Michael Bridge & Louise Gullifer & Eva Lomnicka
  145. Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory Manual, Main Version, 12th Edition: Elaine N. Marieb & Lori A. Smith
  146. Rang & Dale's Pharmacology, 8th Edition: Humphrey P. Rang & James M. Ritter & Rod J. Flower & Graeme Henderson
  147. Classical Geometry: Euclidean, Transformational, Inversive, and Projective, 1st Edition: I. E. Leonard & J. E. Lewis & A. C. F. Liu & G. W. Tokarsky
  148. Solutions Manual to Accompany Classical Geometry: Euclidean, Transformational, Inversive, and Projective, 1st Edition: I. E. Leonard & J. E. Lewis & A. C. F. Liu & G. W. Tokarsky
  149. Fundamentals of Applied Pathophysiology: An Essential Guide for Nursing and Healthcare Students, 3rd Edition: Ian Peate
  150. Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology: For Nursing and Healthcare, 2nd Edition: Ian Peate & Muralitharan Nair
  151. Vacuum and Ultravacuum: Physics and Technology, 1st Edition: Igor Bello
  152. Interpersonal Communication: Building Connections Together, 1st Edition: Michael W. Gamble & Teri Kwal Gamble
  153. Introduction to Criminal Justice: Systems, Diversity, and Change, 3rd Edition: Callie Marie Rennison & Mary J. Dodge
  154. Introduction to Management Science: A Modeling and Case Studies Approach with Spreadsheets, 5th Edition: Frederick S Hillier
  155. The Architecture of Computer Hardware, Systems Software, and Networking: An Information Technology Approach, 5th Edition: Irv Englander
  156. Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions, 10th Edition: Gerald Corey & Marianne Schneider Corey & Cindy Corey
  157. Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics, 8th Edition: James L. Meriam & L. G. Kraige & J. N. Bolton
  158. Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry, 3rd Edition: James E. House & Kathleen A. House
  159. Fundamentals of Quantum Mechanics, 3rd Edition: James E. House
  160. Core Radiology: A Visual Approach to Diagnostic Imaging, 1st Edition: Jacob Mandell
  161. Lehne's Pharmacology for Nursing Care, 9th Edition: Jacqueline Burchum & Laura Rosenthal
  162. Local Anaesthesia in Dentistry, 2nd Edition: Jacques A. Baart & Henk S. Brand
  163. Reading, Understanding, and Applying Nursing Research, 5th Edition: James A. Fain
  164. Business Analytics, Global Edition, 2nd Edition: James R. Evans
  165. Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach, 7th Edition: James Kurose & Keith Ross
  166. Engineering Mechanics: Statics, SI Version, 8th Edition: James L. Meriam & L. G. Kraige & Jeffrey N. Bolton
  167. The Root of Chinese Qigong: Secrets of Health, Longevity, & Enlightenment, 2nd Edition: Jwing-Ming Yang
  168. Macroeconomics, 11th Edition: David Colander
  169. Privileged Presence: Personal Stories of Connections in Health Care, 1st Edition: Liz Crocker & Bev Johnson
  170. Technology for Success and Shelly Cashman Series Microsoft Office 365 & Office 2019, 1st Edition: Sandra Cable & Jennifer T. Campbell & Mark Ciampa & Barbara Clemens & Steven M. Freund
  171. Shelly Cashman Series Microsoft Office 365 & Outlook 2019 Comprehensive, 1st Edition: Corinne Hoisington
  172. Personal Finance, 13th Edition: Jack Kapoor & Les Dlabay & Robert J. Hughes & Melissa Hart
  173. Neurological Rehabilitation, 6th Edition: Darcy Ann Umphred & Rolando T. Lazaro & Gordon Burton & Margaret Roller
  174. Strategies, Techniques, & Approaches to Critical Thinking: A Clinical Reasoning Workbook for Nurses, 6th Edition: Sandra Luz Martinez de Castillo
  175. Microeconomics, 15th Canadian Edition: Campbell R. McConnell & Stanley L. Brue & Sean Masaki Flynn & Tom Barbiero
  176. Human Anatomy, 8th Edition, Global Edition: Marieb Elaine N & Wilhelm Patricia Brady & Mallatt Jon B.
  177. Nursing: The Philosophy and Science of Caring, Revised Edition: Jean Watson
  178. Public Health Nursing: Population-Centered Health Care in the Community, 9th Edition: Marcia Stanhope & Jeanette Lancaster
  179. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: A Strategic Approach with Modern Physics, 4th Edition: Randall D. Knight
  180. Cultural Anthropology: A Toolkit for a Global Age, 2nd Edition: Kenneth J. Guest
  181. Essentials of Biology, 5th Edition: Sylvia Mader & Michael Windelspecht
  182. Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology, 2nd Edition: Kenneth Saladin & Robin McFarland
  183. The Humanistic Tradition: Prehistory to the Early Modern World, Volume 1, 7th Edition: Gloria Fiero
  184. Dental Management of the Pregnant Patient, 1st Edition: Christos A. Skouteris
  185. Organic Chemistry, 9th Edition: Leroy G. Wade & Jan W. Simek
  186. Financial Accounting: Tools for Business Decision Making, 8th Edition: Paul D. Kimmel & Jerry J. Weygandt & Donald E. Kieso
  187. Winningham's Critical Thinking Cases in Nursing: Medical-Surgical, Pediatric, Maternity, and Psychiatric, 5th Edition: Mariann M. Harding & Julie S. Snyder & Barbara A. Preusser
  188. Contemporary Abstract Algebra, 9th Edition: Joseph Gallian
  189. New Perspectives HTML5 and CSS3: Comprehensive, 7th Edition: Patrick M. Carey
  190. Probability & Statistics for Engineers & Scientists, Global Edition, 9th Edition: Ronald E. Walpole & Raymond H. Myers & Sharon L. Myers & Keying E. Ye
  191. LTE Optimization Engineering Handbook, 1st Edition: Xincheng Zhang
  192. A Systematic Approach to Learning Robot Programming with ROS, 1st Edition: Wyatt Newman
  193. Concepts of Genetics, Global Edition, 11th Edition: Michael A. Palladino & Charlotte A. Spencer & Michael R. Cummings & William S. Klug
  194. Dukes' Physiology of Domestic Animals, 13th Edition: William O. Reece & Howard H. Erickson & Jesse P. Goff & Etsuro E. Uemura
  195. Statistics for Engineers and Scientists, 4th Edition: William Navidi
  196. Auditing & Assurance Services: A Systematic Approach: A Systematic Approach, 10th Edition: William Messier & Steven Glover & Douglas Prawitt
  197. Anabolics, 10th Edition: William Llewellyn
  198. Human Sexuality: Diversity in Contemporary America, 8th Edition: William L. Yarber & Barbara W. Sayad & Bryan Strong
  199. Organic Chemistry, 8th Edition: William H. Brown & Brent L. Iverson & Eric V. Anslyn & Christopher S. Foote & Bruce M. Novak
  200. Engineering Economy, 16th Edition: William G. Sullivan & Elin M. Wicks & C. Patrick Koelling
  201. Understanding Business, 12th Edition: William Nickels & James McHugh & Susan McHugh
  202. Understanding Canadian Business, 8th Edition: William G Nickels & James McHugh & Susan McHugh & Rita Cossa & Bob Sproule
  203. Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology, 12th Edition: William D. James & Dirk Elston & Timothy Berger & Isaac Neuhaus
  204. Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering: An Integrated Approach, 5th Edition: William D. Callister
  205. Ecology, 4th Edition: William D. Bowman & Sally D. Hacker & Michael L. Cain
  206. Who Said What?: A Writer's Guide to Finding, Evaluating, Quoting, and Documenting Sources, 1st Edition: Kayla Meyers & Susan Wise Bauer
  207. CNA Certified Nursing Assistant Exam Cram, 2nd Edition: Linda Whitenton & Marty Walker
  208. Nuclear Reactor Physics, 3rd Revised Edition: Weston M. Stacey
  209. Aesthetic Clinic Marketing in the Digital Age, 1st Edition: Wendy Lewis
  210. Ways of the World with Sources: For the AP® Course, 4th Edition: Robert W. Strayer & Eric W. Nelson
  211. Financial Accounting, 11th Edition: Walter T. Harrison & Charles T. Horngren & C. William Thomas & Wendy M. Tietz
  212. Cengage Advantage Books: Understanding Arguments: An Introduction to Informal Logic, 9th Edition: Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Robert J. Fogelin
  213. Classical Mechanics: Systems of Particles and Hamiltonian Dynamics, 2nd Edition: Walter Greiner
  214. Modern Nuclear Chemistry, 2nd Edition: Walter D. Loveland & David J. Morrissey & Glenn T. Seaborg
  215. An Introduction to Language, 11th Edition: Victoria Fromkin & Robert Rodman & Nina Hyams
  216. An Introduction to Language, 10th Edition: Victoria Fromkin & Robert Rodman & Nina Hyams
  217. Harper's Illustrated Biochemistry, 31st Edition: Victor Rodwell & David Bender & Kathleen Botham & Peter Kennelly & P. Anthony Weil
  218. A Practical Study of Argument, Enhanced Edition, 7th Edition: Trudy Govier
  219. Emotional Intelligence 2.0: Travis Bradberry & Jean Greaves & Patrick M. Lencioni
  220. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics, 11th Edition: Tom Tietenberg & Lynne Lewis
  221. Human Molecular Genetics, 4th Edition: Tom Strachan & Andrew Read
  222. Drafting Contracts: How & Why Lawyers Do What They Do, 2nd Edition: Tina L. Stark
  223. Basic Chemistry, Global Edition, 5th Edition: Karen C. Timberlake
  224. Chemistry: The Science in Context, 5th Edition: Stacey Lowery Bretz & Geoffrey Davies & Natalie Foster & Thomas R. Gilbert & Rein V. Kirss
  225. Politics in States and Communities, 15th Edition: Thomas R. Dye & Susan A. MacManus
  226. Aunt Minnie's Atlas and Imaging-Specific Diagnosis, 4th Edition: Thomas L Pope
  227. Cell Biology, 3rd Edition: Thomas D. Pollard & William C. Earnshaw & Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz & Graham Johnson
  228. Chemistry: The Central Science, 14th Edition: Theodore E. Brown & H. Eugene LeMay & Bruce E. Bursten & Catherine Murphy & Patrick Woodward & Matthew E. Stoltzfus
  229. The Crisis of the European Union: Challenges, Analyses, Solutions, 1st Edition: Andreas Grimmel
  230. Clinical Manifestations and Assessment of Respiratory Disease, 7th Edition: Terry Des Jardins & George G. Burton
  231. Earth: An Introduction to Physical Geology, 12th Edition: Edward J. Tarbuck & Frederick K. Lutgens & Dennis G. Tasa
  232. First Aid for the USMLE Step 1 2018, 28th Edition: Tao Le & Vikas Bhushan & Matthew Sochat & Yash Chavda & Andrew Zureick
  233. Introduction to Aircraft Structural Analysis, 2nd Edition: T.H.G. Megson
  234. Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology, Global Edition, 12th Edition: Elaine N. Marieb & Suzanne M. Keller
  235. Brunner and Suddarth's Textbook of Medical Surgical Nursing, 12th Edition, Volume 1: Suzanne C. Smeltzer & Brenda G. Bare & Janice L. Hinkle & Kerry H. Cheever
  236. Remediation Engineering: Design Concepts, 2nd Edition: Suthan S. Suthersan & John Horst & Matthew Schnobrich & Nicklaus Welty & Jeff McDonough
  237. Gray's Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis of Clinical Practice, 41st Edition: Susan Standring
  238. August's Consultations in Feline Internal Medicine, Volume 7, 1st Edition: Susan Little
  239. Perfecting Your English Pronunciation, 2nd Edition: Susan Cameron
  240. Radiologic Science for Technologists: Physics, Biology, and Protection, 11th Edition: Stewart C. Bushong
  241. Law and Society, 11th Edition: Steven Vago & Steven E. Barkan
  242. Chemistry, 10th Edition: Steven S. Zumdahl & Susan A. Zumdahl & Donald J. DeCoste
  243. Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies, 7th Edition: Steven G. Gabbe & Jennifer R. Niebyl & Joe Leigh Simpson & Mark B Landon & Henry L Galan
  244. SuperFreakonomics: Global Cooling, Patriotic Prostitutes, and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance: Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner
  245. Communication: Principles for a Lifetime, 6th Edition: Steven A. Beebe & Susan J. Beebe & Diana K. Ivy
  246. Essentials of Organizational Behavior, Global Edition, 14th Edition: Timothy A. Judge & Stephen P. Robbins
  247. Fortran for Scientists & Engineers, 4th Edition: Stephen Chapman
  248. The Art of Public Speaking, 12th Edition: Stephen Lucas
  249. Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 4th Edition: Stephen Cecchetti & Kermit Schoenholtz
  250. Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World: Christopher Steiner
  251. Clinical Leadership in Nursing and Healthcare: Values into Action, 2nd Edition: David Stanley
  252. Anatomy and Physiology with Integrated Study Guide, 6th Edition: Stanley Gunstream
  253. Computer Security: Principles and Practice, 4th Edition, Global Edition: William Stallings & Lawrie Brown
  254. Human Sexuality in a World of Diversity, 9th Edition: Spencer A. Rathus & Jeffrey S. Nevid & Lois Fichner-Rathus
  255. SOC 2020, 6th Edition: Jon Witt
  256. Calculation of Drug Dosages: A Work Text, 10th Edition: Sheila J. Ogden & Linda Fluharty
  257. Introduction to Linear Programming with MATLAB, 1st Edition: Shashi Kant Mishra & Bhagwat Ram
  258. Do Colors Exist?: And Other Profound Physics Questions, 1st Edition: Seth Stannard Cottrell
  259. Design With Operational Amplifiers And Analog Integrated Circuits, 4th Edition: Sergio Franco
  260. Organic Chemistry: Structure and Function, 7th Edition: K. Peter C. Vollhardt & Neil E. Schore
  261. Psychology, 4th Edition: Saundra K. Ciccarelli & J. Noland White
  262. Psychology, 5th Edition: Saundra K. Ciccarelli & J. Noland White
  263. Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 5th Edition: Sarah S. Long & Charles G. Prober & Marc Fischer
  264. Crash Course Respiratory System, 4th Edition: Sarah Hickin & James Renshaw & Rachel Chapman & Omar Usmani
  265. Psychology in Your Life, 2nd Edition: Sarah Grison & Michael Gazzaniga
  266. Biology and Ecology of Pharmaceutical Marine Plants, 1st Edition: Ramasamy Santhanam & Santhanam Ramesh & Hafiz Ansar & Rasul Suleria
  267. The Art of Problem Solving, Vol. 1: The Basics, 7th Edition: Sandor Lehoczky & Richard Rusczyk
  268. The Logic of American Politics, 8th Edition: Samuel Kernell & Gary C Jacobson & Thad Kousser & Lynn Vavreck
  269. Mastering the World of Psychology, 5th Edition: Samuel E. Wood & Ellen Green Wood & Denise Boyd
  270. 50 Essays: A Portable Anthology, 5th Edition: Samuel Cohen
  271. Principles of Developmental Genetics, 2nd Edition: Sally A. Moody
  272. Engineering Fundamentals: An Introduction to Engineering, SI Edition, 5th Edition: Saeed Moaveni
  273. Video Game Law: Everything you need to know about Legal and Business Issues in the Game Industry, 1st Edition: S. Gregory Boyd & Brian Pyne & Sean F. Kane
  274. The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph, 1st Edition: Ryan Holiday
  275. Engineering Mechanics: Statics & Dynamics, 14th Edition: Russell C. Hibbeler
  276. The Dynamics of Military Revolution, 1300-2050, 1st Edition: MacGregor Knox & Williamson Murray
  277. Statics and Mechanics of Materials, 5th Edition: Russell C. Hibbeler
  278. Mechanics of Materials in SI Units, 10th Edition, Global Edition: Russell C. Hibbeler
  279. Mechanics of Materials, 10th Edition: Russell C. Hibbeler
  280. Fluid Mechanics, Solutions Manual, 1st Edition: Russell C. Hibbeler
  281. Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics, 14th Edition: Russell C. Hibbeler
  282. Intimate Relationships, 8th Edition: Rowland Miller
  283. Abnormal Psychology, 9th Edition: Ronald J. Comer
  284. Interplay: The Process of Interpersonal Communication, 14th Edition: Ronald B. Adler & Lawrence B. Rosenfeld & Russell F. Proctor II
  285. Elementary Statistics: Picturing the World, 6th Edition: Ron Larson & Betsy Farber
  286. Elementary Linear Algebra, 8th Edition: Ron Larson
  287. Calculus, 11th Edition: Ron Larson & Bruce H. Edwards
  288. Comprehensive Gynecology, 7th Edition: Rogerio A. Lobo & David M Gershenson & Gretchen M Lentz & Fidel A Valea
  289. Handbook of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 5th Edition: Roger L. Lundblad & Fiona Macdonald
  290. Marketing, 13th Edition: Roger Kerin & Steven Hartley
  291. Introduction to Wireless Digital Communication: A Signal Processing Perspective, 1st Edition: Robert W. Heath
  292. Chesley's Hypertensive Disorders in Pregnancy, 4th Edition: Robert N. Taylor & James M. Roberts & Gary F. Cunningham & Marshall D. Lindheimer
  293. Egan's Fundamentals of Respiratory Care, 11th Edition: Robert M. Kacmarek & James K. Stoller & Al Heuer
  294. Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice, 7th Edition: Robert K. Creasy & Robert Resnik & Jay D. Iams & Charles J. Lockwood & Thomas Moore & Michael F Greene
  295. Saunders Nursing Drug Handbook 2019, 1st Edition: Robert J. Kizior & Keith Hodgson
  296. Psychological Testing: History, Principles, and Applications, Global Edition, 7th Edition: Robert J. Gregory
  297. Genetics: Analysis and Principles, 6th Edition: Robert Brooker
  298. Clinical Epidemiology: The Essentials, 5th Edition: Robert Fletcher & Suzanne W. Fletcher & Grant S. Fletcher
  299. Principles of Macroeconomics, 6th Edition: Robert Frank & Ben Bernanke & Kate Antonovics & Ori Heffetz
  300. Nuclear Engineering Fundamentals: A Practical Perspective, 1st Edition: Robert E. Masterson
  301. Macroeconomics: Principles and Applications, 6th Edition: Robert E. Hall & Marc Lieberman
  302. Concepts of Genetics, 1st Edition: Robert Brooker
  303. College Algebra, 7th Edition: Robert F. Blitzer
  304. Social Psychology, 14th Edition: Nyla R. Branscombe & Robert A. Baron
  305. Woelfels Dental Anatomy, 9th Edition: Rickne Scheid & Gabriela Weiss
  306. Human Genetics Concepts and Applications, 11th Edition: Ricki Lewis
  307. Sociology: A Brief Introduction, 12th Edition: Richard T. Schaefer
  308. Essentials of Sociology, 6th Edition: Richard P. Appelbaum & Deborah Carr & Mitchell Duneier & Anthony Giddens
  309. Laboratory Manual in Physical Geology, 10th Edition: Richard M. Busch & Dennis G. Tasa
  310. Plain English for Lawyers, 5th Edition: Richard C. Wydick
  311. Text and Atlas of Wound Diagnosis and Treatment, 2nd Edition: Rose Hamm
  312. The Little Seagull Handbook, 3rd Edition: Richard Bullock & Michal Brody & Francine Weinberg
  313. Looking at Movies: An Introduction to Film, 5th Edition: Richard Barsam & Dave Monahan
  314. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods, 23rd Edition: Richard A. McPherson & Matthew R. Pincus
  315. The Fish That Ate the Whale: The Life and Times of America's Banana King, 1st Edition: Rich Cohen
  316. Health: The Basics, The Mastering Health Edition, 12th Edition: Rebecca J. Donatelle
  317. Introduction to Forest Ecosystem Science and Management, 3rd Edition: Raymond A. Young & Ronald L. Giese
  318. College Physics, 11th Edition: Raymond A. Serway & Chris Vuille
  319. Calculus for Business, Economics, Life Sciences, and Social Sciences, 13th Edition: Raymond A. Barnett & Michael R. Ziegler & Karl E. Byleen
  320. Managerial Accounting, 16th Edition: Ray Garrison & Eric Noreen & Peter Brewer
  321. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: A Strategic Approach with Modern Physics, Global Edition, 4th Edition: Randall D. Knight
  322. Nuclear Medicine Physics: The Basics, 8th Edition: Ramesh Chandra & Arman Rahmim
  323. General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications, 11th Edition: Petrucci Ralph H. & Herring F. Geoffrey & Madura Jeffry D. & Bissonnette Carey
  324. Gear Cutting Tools: Science and Engineering, 2nd Edition: Stephen P. Radzevich
  325. Human Resource Management, 14th Edition, Global Edition: Mondy R. Wayne & Martocchio Joseph J.
  326. Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals, 2nd Edition: R. Michael Akers & D. Michael Denbow
  327. Macroeconomics, 6th Edition: R. Glenn Hubbard & Anthony Patrick O'Brien
  328. Essentials of Economics, 5th Edition: R. Glenn Hubbard & Anthony Patrick O'Brien
  329. Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties: A Commentary, 2012th Edition: Oliver Dörr & Kirsten Schmalenbach
  330. Pulmonary Pathology: An Atlas and Text, 3rd Edition: Philip T. Cagle
  331. A Framework for Marketing Management, Global Edition, 6th Edition: Philip Kotler & Kevin Keller
  332. International Marketing, 17th Edition: Philip R. Cateora & John Graham & Mary C Gilly
  333. Principles of Marketing, 17th Edition: Philip Kotler & Gary Armstrong
  334. Ultrasonography in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 5th Edition: Peter W. Callen
  335. Psychology, 7th Edition: Peter O. Gray & David F. Bjorklund
  336. Collaborative Therapy: Relationships And Conversations That Make a Difference, 1st Edition: Harlene Anderson
  337. Emery's Elements of Medical Genetics, 15th Edition: Peter D Turnpenny & Sian Ellard
  338. GRE Prep Plus 2021: Kaplan Test Prep
  339. Introduction to Managerial Accounting, 7th Edition: Peter Brewer & Ray Garrison & Eric Noreen
  340. Financial Management for Decision Makers, 8th edition: Peter Atrill
  341. Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics, Structure, and Change, 10th Edition: Peter Atkins & Julio de Paula
  342. Organic Chemistry, 8th Edition: Paula Yurkanis Bruice
  343. The Art and Craft of Problem Solving, 2nd Edition: Paul Zeitz
  344. International Economics: Theory and Policy, Global Edition, 11th Edition: Marc Melitz & Paul R. Krugman & Maurice Obstfeld
  345. Statistics for Business and Economics, 8th Edition, Global Edition: Paul Newbold
  346. Cheese: Chemistry, Physics and Microbiology, Volume 1, 4th Edition: Paul L. H. McSweeney & Patrick F. Fox & Paul D. Cotter & David W Everett
  347. Essentials of Economics, 3rd Edition: Paul Krugman & Robin Wells & Kathryn Graddy
  348. Microeconomics, 4th Edition: Paul Krugman
  349. Economics, 4th Edition: Paul Krugman & Robin Wells
  350. World Religions in Practice: A Comparative Introduction, 2nd Edition: Paul Gwynne
submitted by bookseller10 to eTextbooks [link] [comments]


2020.08.01 06:03 errandmelancholy (Trigger warning) Tried to end it all because Student Finance kept rejecting my evidence

( Mentions of suicide attempt and mental health issues. Read it with caution)
No matter if it is sounds edgy or pathetic, this kept bugging my mind and I'm writing this all down 4:49am in a morning.
Yesterday, after work I got email regarding my residency period proof for the Student Finance England UK. If you haven't seen my previous post, it's basically a loan company where you can borrow tuition and maintenance loan for your university course. Of course, if you're an EU resident you have to prove 5 years of residency starting from the exact 2015 September 1st date. I started school 2015 May and then changed schools in 2016 but always stayed studying so I sent them official documents regarding my attendance with stamps and signed etc w an included address. Cant prove it w child benefits because mum didn't claim them as it was all in English language. Last year I couldn't prove it so I had to defer my course. This year...Imagine a one single email you've been waiting for a month to completely turn your entire mental well-being to 360°. Imagine trying so hard because you're really determined to go to the university and learn even during a pandemic and someone crushes it completely.
It got me hard. I kept being tempted to genuinely pull out that clothing hanger and a belt to set it up and end it all despite knowing there are solutions to the problem I'm having. I am tired. Tired of waiting. Tired of trying to prove that I genuinely lived here for 5 damn years and nothing seems to work. Even right now as I'm writing, I feel the temptation to end it all right now and it is very very scary.
In regards of my mental health, I tried getting help beforehand. The lady referred me to these local social groups which maybe could have helped me but because I struggle to talk socially with new people about my problems I didn't go. I need genuine therapy like help because this is not me and I want to live. I've got my friends with me so hopefully I will feel a little bit better today.
I don't want to die yet why I'm so self destructing all of my own being...
submitted by errandmelancholy to offmychest [link] [comments]


2020.07.31 19:38 errandmelancholy I hate the fact there's only one available finance company for the university and I don't qualify for any of the scholarships

I apologize for my grammar issues, I'm just so angry and upset at what has happened.
In the UK, if you're not a UK passport holder, you must prove your residency period to Student Finance England which for me who was a minor, I have to prove it using attendance letter and exam results. So if the course starts in September 2020, I have to prove I lived in UK and attended school from 2015 September 1st till 2018 August. I have attended two schools and the first one was around 2015 May so I thought I'd be able to prove it. Last year I couldn't prove my residency so I had to deffer my course till 2020. Today I've got an email saying I have no proved my residency despite the fact I've got a settled status which they asked for, TWO DAMN SCHOOL LETTERS THAT WERE STAMPED AND SIGNED BY MY TEACHERS, AND GCSE/A-Level EXAM RESULTS W CERTIFICATES. I honestly losing my will because I really really want to attend uni and get away from my family yet for some damn fucking reason I can't seem to provide right fucking documents. I lived in UK for five and a half years and studied here and now I'm paying tax so why I still can't get a tuition loan from SFE?????? And they're taking a month to respond. I don't know what to do. Last time I called I was basically ignored and they didn't want to listen to me while I was distressed and confused at the situation.
submitted by errandmelancholy to offmychest [link] [comments]


2020.07.30 22:11 bookseller10 Mega eTextbooks release thread (part-31)! Find your textbooks here between $5-$25 :)

Please find the list below:
  1. Davis's Drug Guide for Nurses, 15th Edition: April Hazard Vallerand & Cynthia A Sanoski & Judith Hopfer Deglin
  2. Pediatric Dentistry: Infancy through Adolescence, 6th Edition: Arthur Nowak & John R. Christensen & Tad R. Mabry & Janice Alisa Townsend & Martha H. Wells
  3. Macroeconomics: Principles, Applications, and Tools, 8th Edition: Arthur O'Sullivan & Steven Sheffrin & Stephen Perez
  4. Crafting & Executing Strategy: The Quest for Competitive Advantage: Concepts and Cases, 20th Edition: Arthur Thompson & Margaret Peteraf & John Gamble & A. Strickland
  5. Kozier & Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing, 10th Edition: Audrey T. Berman & Shirlee Snyder & Geralyn Frandsen
  6. Pickard's Guide to Minimally Invasive Operative Dentistry, 10th Edition: Avit Banerjee & Timothy F. Watson
  7. Retail Management, Global Edition, 13th Edition: Joel R. Evans & Patrali M. Chatterjee & Barry R. Berman
  8. The Pancreas: An Integrated Textbook of Basic Science, Medicine, and Surgery, 3rd Edition: Hans G. Beger & Andrew L. Warshaw & Ralph H. Hruban & Markus W. Buchler & Markus M. Lerch & John P. Neoptolemos & Tooru Shimosegawa & David C. Whitcomb
  9. Principles of Accounting, 12th Edition: Belverd E. Needles & Marian Powers & Susan V. Crosson
  10. Principles of Accounting, 11th Edition: Belverd E. Needles & Marian Powers & Susan V. Crosson
  11. Genetics Essentials: Concepts and Connections, 3rd Edition: Benjamin A. Pierce
  12. Genetics: A Conceptual Approach, 6th Edition: Benjamin A. Pierce
  13. We the People, Essentials 11th Edition: Benjamin Ginsberg & Theodore J. Lowi & Caroline J. Tolbert & Margaret Weir
  14. We the People, Core 11th Edition: Benjamin Ginsberg & Theodore J. Lowi & Caroline J. Tolbert & Margaret Weir
  15. Renewable Energy: Physics, Engineering, Environmental Impacts, Economics and Planning, 5th Edition: Bent Sørensen
  16. Qualitative Research Methods for the Social Sciences, Global Edition, 9th Edition: Howard Lune & Bruce L. Berg
  17. Fundamentals of Biostatistics, 8th Edition: Bernard Rosner
  18. Basic and Clinical Pharmacology, 14th Edition: Bertram Katzung
  19. Integrated Science, 6th Edition: Bill Tillery & Eldon Enger & Frederick Ross
  20. Physical Science, 11th Edition: Bill Tillery & Stephanie J. Slater & Timothy F. Slater
  21. The Johns Hopkins Internal Medicine Board Review: Certification and Recertification, 5th Edition: Bimal Ashar & Redonda Miller & Stephen Sisson & Johns Hopkins
  22. Large Animal Internal Medicine, 5th Edition: Bradford P. Smith
  23. Calculus: Single Variable, 7th Edition: Deborah Hughes-Hallett & William G. McCallum & Andrew M. Gleason
  24. McGraw-Hill's Taxation of Individuals and Business Entities, 10th Edition: Brian Spilker & Benjamin Ayers & John Barrick & Edmund Outslay
  25. Writing and Editing for Digital Media, 3rd Edition: Brian Carroll
  26. Ecology of Freshwaters: Earth's Bloodstream, 5th Edition: Brian R. Moss
  27. Anatomy and Physiology Coloring Workbook: A Complete Study Guide, Global Edition, 12th Edition: Elaine N. Marieb & Simone Brito
  28. Essential Cell Biology, 4th Edition: Bruce Alberts & Dennis Bray & Karen Hopkin & Alexander D Johnson & Julian Lewis & Martin Raff & Keith Roberts & Peter Walter
  29. Harrisons Manual of Oncology, 2nd Edition: Bruce Chabner & Thomas Lynch & Dan Longo
  30. Black's Law Dictionary, Abridged, 9th Edition: Bryan A. Garner
  31. Black's Law Dictionary, Standard, 9th Edition: Bryan A. Garner
  32. Chemistry, 4th Edition: Julia Burdge
  33. Hole's Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology, 13th Edition: David Shier & Jackie Butler & Ricki Lewis
  34. Van De Graaff's Photographic Atlas for the Biology Laboratory, 7th Edition: Byron J. Adams & John L. Crawley
  35. Contemporary Implant Dentistry, 3rd Edition: Carl E. Misch
  36. Financial Accounting, 12th Edition: Carl S Warren & James M Reeve & Jonathan Duchac
  37. Statistics for Business and Economics: Global Edition, 11th Edition: Paul Newbold & William Carlson & Betty Thorne
  38. Anatomy: A Regional Atlas of the Human Body, 6th Edition: Carmine D. Clemente
  39. Clemente's Anatomy Dissector, 3rd Edition: Carmine D. Clemente
  40. Fundamentals of Nursing: The Art and Science of Nursing Care, 7th Edition: Carol R. Taylor
  41. Private Security and the Law, 5th Edition: Charles P. Nemeth
  42. Human Resource Management in a Hospitality ,1st Edition: Jerald Chesser
  43. The Chicano Experience: An Alternative Perspective: Alfredo Mirandé
  44. Nuclear Physics of Stars, 2nd Edition: Christian Iliadis
  45. International Human Resource Management, 4th Edition: Christopher Brewster & Elizabeth Houldsworth & Paul Sparrow & Guy Vernon
  46. Social Engineering: The Science of Human Hacking, 2nd Edition: Christopher Hadnagy
  47. Psychology, 5th Edition, Global Edition: Saundra K. Ciccarelli & J. Noland White
  48. Seeley's Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, 9th Edition: Cinnamon VanPutte & Jennifer Regan & Andrew Russo
  49. Mass Media Law, 20th Edition: Clay Calvert & Dan V. Kozlowski & Derigan Silver
  50. Handbook of Methods in Aquatic Microbial Ecology, 1st Edition: Paul F. Kemp & Jonathan J. Cole & Barry F. Sherr & Evelyn B. Sherr
  51. Gray Hat Hacking: The Ethical Hacker's Handbook, 5th Edition: Allen Harper & Daniel Regalado & Ryan Linn & Stephen Sims & Branko Spasojevic & Linda Martinez & Michael Baucom & Chris Eagle & Shon Harris
  52. Heinemann Physics 12, 4th Edition: Doug Bail & Greg Moran & Keith Burrows & Rob Chapman & Ann Conibear & Carmel Fry
  53. Nursing2018 Drug Handbook, 38th Edition: Lippincott
  54. College Algebra: Concepts Through Functions, 4th Edition: Michael Sullivan & Michael Sullivan III
  55. Concepts in Strategic Management and Business Policy: Globalization, Innovation and Sustainability, 15th Edition: Thomas L. Wheelen & J. David Hunger & Alan N. Hoffman & Charles E. Bamford
  56. Master the Boards USMLE Step 2 CK, 4th Edition: Conrad Fischer
  57. Master the Boards USMLE Step 3, 5th Edition: Conrad Fischer
  58. Criminological and Forensic Psychology, 2nd Edition: Helen Gavin
  59. Cultural Anthropology, 15th Edition: Carol R. Ember & Melvin Ember
  60. Concepts of Genetics, Global Edition, 11th Edition: Michael A. Palladino & Charlotte A. Spencer & Michael R. Cummings & William S. Klug
  61. Marketing Research, Global Edition, 8th Edition: D Pati
  62. Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology, 1st Edition: D.B.A. Mehdi Khosrow-Pour
  63. No B.S. Direct Marketing: The Ultimate No Holds Barred Kick Butt Take No Prisoners Direct Marketing for Non-Direct Marketing Businesses, 3rd Edition: Dan S. Kennedy
  64. Horngren's Cost Accounting: A Managerial Emphasis, Global Edition, 16th Edition: Srikant M. Datar & Madhav V. Rajan
  65. Fundamental Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences, 8th Edition: David C. Howell
  66. Encyclopedia of School Health, 1st Edition: David C. Wiley & Amy C. Cory
  67. Myers' Psychology for AP®, 2nd Edition: David G. Myers
  68. Exploring Psychology, 10th Edition: David G. Myers & C. Nathan DeWall
  69. Psychology, 11th Edition: David C. Myers & C. Nathan DeWall
  70. An Introduction to Cognitive Psychology: Processes and disorders, 3rd Edition: David Groome
  71. Fundamentals of Physics, 10th Edition: David Halliday & Robert Resnick & Jearl Walker
  72. McMinn's Concise Human Anatomy, 2nd Edition: David Heylings & Stephen W. Carmichael & Samuel John Leinster & Janak Saada
  73. Cardiac Intensive Care, 3rd Edition: David L. Brown
  74. Jekel's Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Preventive Medicine, 4th Edition: David L. Katz & Joann G. Elmore & Dorothea Wild & Sean C Lucan
  75. Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry, 7th Edition: David L. Nelson & Michael M. Cox
  76. Anesthesiology, 3rd Edition: David E. Longnecker & Mark F. Newman & Warren M. Zapol & Warren Sandberg & Sean Mackey
  77. Real Estate Principles: A Value Approach, 5th Edition: David Ling & Wayne Archer
  78. The Practice of Statistics for Business and Economics, 4th Edition: Layth C. Alwan & Bruce A. Craig
  79. Employment Law for Business, 9th Edition: Dawn Bennett-Alexander & Laura Hartman
  80. McDonald and Avery's Dentistry for the Child and Adolescent, 10th Edition: Jeffrey A. Dean
  81. Modern Blood Banking & Transfusion Practices, 6th Edition: Denise M. Harmening
  82. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Edition: Dennis L. Kasper & Anthony S. Fauci & Stephen L. Hauser & Dan L. Longo & J. Larry Jameson & Joseph Loscalzo
  83. Public Relations: Strategies and Tactics, Global Edition, 11th Edition: Dennis L. Wilcox & Glen T. Cameron & Bryan H. Reber
  84. A Pocket Style Manual, APA Version, 7th Edition: Diana Hacker & Nancy Sommers
  85. Physical Geology: Earth Revealed, 9th Edition: Diane Carlson & Charles Plummer
  86. Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology, 4th Edition: Donald C Rizzo
  87. Intermediate Accounting, 16th Edition: Donald E. Kieso & Jerry J. Weygandt & Terry D. Warfield
  88. Fundamentals of Biochemistry: Life at the Molecular Level, 5th Edition: Donald Voet & Judith G. Voet & Charlotte W. Pratt
  89. Medical-Surgical Nursing: Concepts for Interprofessional Collaborative Care, Single Volume, 9th Edition: Donna D. Ignatavicius & M. Linda Workman & Cherie Rebar
  90. Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers, 6th Edition: Douglas C. Montgomery & George C. Runger
  91. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 11th Edition: Douglas P. Zipes & Peter Libby & Robert O. Bonow & Douglas L. Mann & Gordon F. Tomaselli
  92. Rock Slope Engineering: Civil Applications, 5th Edition: Duncan C. Wyllie
  93. Earth: An Introduction to Physical Geology, 11th Edition: Edward J. Tarbuck & Frederick K. Lutgens & Dennis G. Tasa
  94. Earth Science, 14th Edition: Edward J. Tarbuck & Frederick K. Lutgens & Dennis G. Tasa
  95. Applications and Investigations in Earth Science, 8th Edition: Edward J. Tarbuck & Frederick K. Lutgens & Dennis G. Tasa & Kenneth G. Pinzke
  96. Cunningham and Gilstrap's Operative Obstetrics, 3rd Edition: Edward R. Yeomans & Barbara L. Hoffman & Larry C. Gilstrap & F. Gary Cunningham
  97. International Human Resource Management: Globalization, National Systems and Multinational Companies, New edition: Tony Edwards & Chris Rees
  98. Anatomy and Physiology Coloring Workbook: A Complete Study Guide, 12th Edition: Elaine N. Marieb & Simone Brito
  99. Human Anatomy, 8th Edition, Global Edition: Marieb Elaine & Wilhelm Patricia Brady & Mallatt Jon B.
  100. Intermediate Accounting, 2nd Edition: Elizabeth A. Gordon & Jana S. Raedy & Alexander J. Sannella
  101. Concepts in Enterprise Resource Planning, 4th Edition: Ellen Monk & Bret Wagner
  102. Social Psychology, 9th Edition: Elliot Aronson & Timothy D. Wilson & Robin M. Akert & Samuel R. Sommers
  103. Abnormal Child Psychology, 6th Edition: Eric J Mash & David A Wolfe
  104. Python Crash Course: A Hands-On, Project-Based Introduction to Programming, 1st Edition: Eric Matthes
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  108. Operations and Supply Chain Management, 15th Edition: F. Robert Jacobs & Richard Chase
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  110. Compound Semiconductors: Physics, Technology, and Device Concepts, 1st Edition: Ferdinand Scholz
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  126. Thomas' Calculus in SI Units, 13th Edition: George Thomas
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  128. "They Say / I Say": The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing, with 2016 MLA Update, 3rd Edition: Gerald Graff & Cathy Birkenstein
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  143. HESI Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN Examination, 5th Edition: HESI
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  178. Public Health Nursing: Population-Centered Health Care in the Community, 9th Edition: Marcia Stanhope & Jeanette Lancaster
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  240. Radiologic Science for Technologists: Physics, Biology, and Protection, 11th Edition: Stewart C. Bushong
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  247. Fortran for Scientists & Engineers, 4th Edition: Stephen Chapman
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  259. Design With Operational Amplifiers And Analog Integrated Circuits, 4th Edition: Sergio Franco
  260. Organic Chemistry: Structure and Function, 7th Edition: K. Peter C. Vollhardt & Neil E. Schore
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  277. Statics and Mechanics of Materials, 5th Edition: Russell C. Hibbeler
  278. Mechanics of Materials in SI Units, 10th Edition, Global Edition: Russell C. Hibbeler
  279. Mechanics of Materials, 10th Edition: Russell C. Hibbeler
  280. Fluid Mechanics, Solutions Manual, 1st Edition: Russell C. Hibbeler
  281. Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics, 14th Edition: Russell C. Hibbeler
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  332. International Marketing, 17th Edition: Philip R. Cateora & John Graham & Mary C Gilly
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2020.07.06 14:59 rusticgorilla [Lost in the Sauce] Trump prioritizes statues of racist generals over human lives

Welcome to Lost in the Sauce, keeping you caught up on political and legal news that often gets buried in distractions and theater… or a global health crisis.
I might do a coronavirus-centric post tomorrow or Wednesday, couldn’t fit it here. Will have to do it this weekend or next week, sorry. Working on an article for FN.
Housekeeping:

Statues over people

Over the past week, we’ve seen the crystallization of Trump’s apparent re-election strategy: protect statues at all costs. During his two public speeches (clip 1 (clip 2), Trump focused on confederate monuments and “cancel culture” while the nation grapples with a record-breaking number of coronavirus cases and a struggling economy.
Trump promised to veto this year’s annual defense bill if an amendment is included that would require the Pentagon to change the names of bases named for Confederate military leaders… Sen. Elizabeth Warren sponsored the amendment that would change the names of 10 bases named after Confederate generals as well as remove Confederate likenesses, symbols, and paraphernalia from defense facilities nationwide within three years.
  • The amendment is unlikely to be removed, however, as it passed the Republican-led Senate Armed Services Committee with bipartisan support. This means that it would require 60 votes on the Senate floor to get rid of it.
  • Warren: “The decision to remove the names of Confederate generals who took up arms against the United States in defense of slavery was a bipartisan decision that came out of the committee, and it’s going to stay in the defense budget. The president can do what he wants, but it stays.”
Trump signed an executive order on June 26 directing the Department of Justice to “prosecute to the fullest extent permitted under Federal law” people who damage federal monuments. He took to Twitter to announce the order: “Long prison terms for these lawless acts against our Great Country!” Damaging federal property can be punished by up to 10 years in prison.
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) plans to introduce legislation withholding federal funding for states and cities that don't adequately protect statues and monuments. Trump’s executive order included a provision to do the same, but the White House is not in a position to enforce such a clause.
The Department of Homeland Security announced a new task force to protect "American monuments, memorials and statues." DHS said it was launching rapid deployment teams to federal monuments over the July 4th weekend. "DHS should not be prioritizing the protection of property over the wellbeing of Black and Brown communities,” the ACLU responded.
  • Just want to point out: The federal government apparently has the resources to spare to guard monuments but not to conduct thorough contact tracing and isolation.
During Trump’s Mount Rushmore speech, he announced an executive order establishing a "national garden” for statues of “American heroes” (video). The choice in statues proves that the idea is meant as a divisive wedge issue. Indeed, there is already a “Hall of Fame for Great Americans” in existence in the Bronx.

Appointee controversies

Trump’s nominee to be ambassador to Norway was involved in the creation of a racist campaign flyer in the 1990s and failed to disclose subsequent legal action associated with it. Mark Burkhalter helped create a flier that distorted the features of a black politician in Georgia, darkened his features, gave him a large afro, and prompted a libel suit.
  • Senate Foreign Relations Committee Ranking Member Robert Menendez is urging the White House to withdraw Burkhalter’s nomination: "During this time of national trauma and reckoning over violence and racist actions against African-Americans, however, it is unthinkable to nominate for a position of public trust an individual who participated in such a despicable, racist scheme," Menendez wrote in a letter.
Trump appointee Michael Pack fired the top officials of the USAGM’s internet freedom group. In less than a decade, the Open Technology Fund has quietly become integral to the world’s repressed communities. Over two billion people in 60 countries rely on tools developed and supported by the fund, like Signal and Tor, to connect to the internet securely and send encrypted messages in authoritarian societies.
The White House directed Defense Department officials to hire former National Security Council staffer Rich Higgins, who was fired for circulating a conspiratorial memo and known for Islamophobic tweets… The move is part of an aggressive push to staff the Pentagon with figures loyal to Trump and with connections to Michael Flynn.
White House is conducting “loyalty test” interviews with political appointees at the Pentagon. The interviews will be conducted by two subordinates of John McEntee, Trump’s former body man who now runs the personnel office: John Troup Hemenway, an undergraduate student, and Jordan Hayley, who graduated from university last month.
House Democrats call for firing of USAID political appointee with history of Islamophobic statements… Religious freedom adviser Mark Kevin Lloyd shared a Facebook post calling Islam “a barbaric cult” and accused Obama of being connected with the Muslim Brotherhood. Reps. Joaquin Castro and Ilhan Omar: “He does not represent the values of our country, and he should not be in a position to betray our nation’s constitutional promise of religious freedom.”
A second USAID Trump appointee is under fire for hate-filled rhetoric, including anti-immigrant and anti-LGBTQ comments. Merritt Corrigan, the recently appointed deputy White House liaison at USAID, said “women shouldn’t be in office” and urged followers to “speak out now about the transsexual agenda before it becomes normalized."

Court cases

Coming up this morning: More Supreme Court opinions to be released at 10 am (ET). There are eight cases that have yet to be ruled on, including those involving Trump’s finances.
The Supreme Court agreed Thursday to hear arguments this fall about Mueller’s grand jury evidence, postponing the House Judiciary Committee’s potential access to the material until after the election. SCOTUS could have declined the hear the case, preserving the lower court ruling granting the committee access.
Last week, SCOTUS struck down a Louisiana law that required abortion providers to have admitting privileges at local hospitals. The ruling should be seen only as a momentary win, as Chief Justice Roberts didn’t rule on the merits of a constitutionally protected right to abortion—rather he deferred to the power of the court itself, leaving the door open for future challenges.
  • The Supreme Court also gave Indiana a second chance to revive two restrictive abortion laws - one imposing an ultrasound requirement and the other expanding parental notification when minors seek abortions - by throwing out a lower court's rulings to block them.
  • Related: Missouri Supreme Court denies attempt to defund Planned Parenthood
  • More on Roberts: “[H]e is moving the ball steadily down the constitutional field, toward the conservative end zone. Of the dozen 5-to-4 cases decided by the Supreme Court this term, Roberts is the only justice to have been in the majority each time. He sided with the liberals just twice.”
The Supreme Court ruled that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is constitutionally valid but the director can be removed by the president at will. The outcome is a mixed bag, but Elizabeth Warren - creator of the agency - highlighted the fact that the conservative court ruled “the CFPB is here to stay.” Furthermore, if Biden wins in November, the decision allows him to fire Trump’s director before her term would have ended.
The Supreme Court declined to take up the case of federal death row prisoners who had challenged the government’s lethal injection protocol, paving the way for the Trump administration to carry out the first executions at the federal level in nearly two decades.
The Supreme Court ruled that states must allow religious schools to participate in programs that provide scholarships to students attending private schools, a decision that opened the door to more public funding of religious education.
The upshot: Taxpayers in most of the country will soon start funding overtly religious education—including the indoctrination of children into a faith that might clash with their own conscience. For example, multiple schools that participate in Montana’s scholarship program inculcate students with a virulent anti-LGBTQ ideology that compares homosexuality to bestiality and incest…
A New York appellate court lifted the temporary restraining order against Simon & Schuster, allowing the publisher to continue printing and distributing Mary Trump’s book. The next hearing regarding the restraining order against Mary herself is scheduled for this Friday.
UPDATE: "Due to high demand and extraordinary interest in this book, Too Much and Never Enough by Mary L. Trump will now be published on July 14, 2020," Simon & Schuster says. The previous publishing date was July 28.
In court filings, Mary Trump argues that the confidentiality agreement she signed 19 years ago was an unenforceable fraud. Her lawyers state that when she signed the NDA, she believed the asset amounts in it were accurate but learned they were bogus from a New York Times expose. Essentially, Mary says the president and his siblings of engaging in systematic fraud by devaluing assets.
“The Times found that the Trump family had engineered ‘friendly’ appraisals for Beach Haven and Shore Haven Apartments—two of the largest ‘crown jewels’ of Fred Trump’s empire—that were significantly and deliberately undervalued to avoid a variety of tax payments,” the memo stated. “Those undervalued appraisals, part of the Trump tax avoidance scheme, were relied upon in the Settlement Agreement—which Ms. Trump has testified she would not have signed if she had known about the fraudulent appraisals.”
See also “Voting Rights” section

Trump campaign and properties

Health secretary Alex Azar focuses trips on swing states needed by Trump… Azar’s travel priorities appear to be related to politics, not the states fighting the worst outbreaks, according to Obama-era officials.
Last year, the Republican National Convention began cutting checks to a former producer of NBC’s Celebrity Apprentice who was accused of having, as one contestant put it, “all the dirt” on Donald Trump. The RNC’s disbursements to Labella’s firm appear to be the first payments ever made by a federal political committee to either Labella personally or his company. But a RNC spokesperson described his role for the convention as that of a standard event producer.
Trump is planning on holding a $580,600-per-couple campaign fundraiser in Broward County this week. Last month, Trump resumed in-person fundraising with two events, including a June 11 gathering in Dallas that cost $580,600 per couple. The campaign said it raised more than $10 million through that event.
A t-shirt for sale on Trump’s official campaign website displays an “america First” logo with a striking similarity to the Nazis' Iron Eagle symbol (comparison). A little over two weeks ago, Facebook removed numerous Trump campaign posts and ads featuring an upside down red triangle symbol once used by Nazis to identify political opponents.
  • Let’s not forget that a little over a week ago, Trump retweeted a video that included a Trump supporter shouting “white power.” The president commented that his supporters in the video are “great people.” Staffers tried for three hours to reach Trump to get permission to delete the tweet, but Trump was on the golf course.
Speaking of Trump and golfing, this weekend Trump spent his 365th day as president on one of his own properties. In fact, on the day the U.S. set a daily global record for the coronavirus pandemic - surpassing 55,000 new cases - Trump was golfing.
Further reading: “Pence donors, allies helped finance vice president's legal defense fund for Mueller probe” and “The owner ‘The Hill’ helped secure an unpaid White House position for his wife — a fact the publication did not disclose to readers.”

Voting rights

The Supreme Court blocked a trial judge’s order that would have made it easier for voters in three Alabama counties to use absentee ballots in this month’s primary runoff election. State officials had asked the court to block a lower court’s order that eased photo ID and witness requirements for absentee voting during the pandemic.
The Supreme Court declined to fast-track a bid by Texas Democrats to decide whether all Texas voters can vote by mail during the coronavirus pandemic… Texas law allows voters to mail in their ballots only if they are 65 or older, confined in jail, will be out of the county during the election period, or cite a disability or illness.
A federal appeals court halted the voting registration of thousands of Florida felons who cannot pay fines or fees, just weeks after a lower court threw out the state law mandating payment of all legal financial obligations before voting. The 11th Circuit decision granted Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis’ request to suspend voter registration until the full court hears the case.
  • Reminder: Late last year, the Senate confirmed Judge Barbara Lagoa to the 11th Circuit, flipping the court to majority GOP appointees.
A federal appeals court in Wisconsin has reaffirmed voting restrictions favored by Republicans, limiting early voting to 2 weeks before an election and barring voters from receiving ballots via email or fax.
In some good news, the Atlanta Hawks is going to turn its arena into the largest polling site in state history. Hundreds of Hawks employees and arena staff will be trained as election workers at the 700,000-square-foot venue, which hosts more than 16,000 spectators for basketball games and 21,000 for concerts. The team says parking will be free for voters and more than 1,500 spaces will be made available.

Immigration

ICE unlawfully jails unaccompanied migrant children once they turn 18, judge rules… Many of ICE’s largest field offices “nearly automatically” send minors to adult jails, even when in extreme cases their parents in the United States or other sponsors would take them, the judge wrote.
The week before last, a federal judge ordered the release of children held with their parents in U.S. immigration jails and denounced the Trump administration’s prolonged detention of families during the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Prior to the ruling, it was reported that eleven immigrants held inside a detention facility for families in Texas have tested positive for COVID-19
  • Further reading: ICE Asked Parents to Choose Between Family Separation and Prolonged Detention—During a Pandemic
A government watchdog agency responsible for overseeing the conditions that federal agencies hold immigrants in said it will not be visiting facilities because of the coronavirus, which observers worry will diminish independent inspections.
'Suddenly they started gassing us': Cuban migrants tell of shocking attack at Ice prison… Refugees say protest against risk of Covid-19 was violently suppressed at New Mexico facility run by private firm CoreCivic.
A federal judge overturned a Trump border rule requiring immigrants to first claim asylum in another country… Trump-appointee Judge Timothy J. Kelly of Washington, D.C. ruled that the administration’s rule violated the Immigration and Nationality Act.
The Trump administration is preparing broad new immigration restrictions that would deny humanitarian refuge to anyone from a country with a disease outbreak, deeming those asylum seekers to be a danger to public safety.
  • Meanwhile, travelers from the U.S. are banned from entering countries in Europe, must quarantine when visiting England, and will have to pass through health checkpoints to visit Sonora (the Mexican state that borders Arizona).
The US agency that oversees and administers key facets of the immigration system, including the processing of citizenship, green cards, and asylum applications is about to come to a near halt. If Congress does not provide US Citizenship and Immigration Services with emergency funding before Aug. 3, the employees, who make up more than 60% of all staffers, will be furloughed.
Border wall built by Trump’s hand-picked contractor is in danger of falling into the Rio Grande… Trump supporters funded the private border wall on the banks of the Rio Grande, helping the builder secure $1.7 billion in federal contracts. Last December, Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., called for the Pentagon’s inspector general to review Fisher’s first $400 million fence contract, awarded in December over concerns of “inappropriate influence.” The audit is ongoing.
Fun fact: All but 3 of the 216 miles of border wall constructed by the Trump administration are essentially much larger replacements of existing, dilapidated fences or vehicle barriers

Environment

  • Pro-pipeline letters by key legislators, including North Dakota’s governor, were actually ghostwritten by a fossil fuel company
  • The Fed Is Bailing Out Polluters While Cities Struggle: Fossil fuel interests have readier access to stimulus money than many local governments.
  • Trump's trade war hurt Maine's lobster industry. He falsely blames Obama: The president has moved to bail out the state's all-important seafood industry. But his policies caused the problem.
    • White House directs Agriculture Department to extend farmer bailout money to lobster industry
  • Trump’s EPA balks at a chance to save black lives: Soot sickens and kills people of color disproportionately. The EPA has decided to not tighten standards that would protect them and others.
  • A Democratic U.S. senator says he has written to Attorney General William Barr outlining his concerns about potential “political interference” by the Trump administration in an investigation of a private espionage firm that targeted environmental groups in the United States.
  • The Trump administration proposed to open more than two-thirds of the nation’s largest piece of public land to oil and gas drilling, removing wildlife protections for the Alaskan tract that have been in place for more than four decades.
  • Trump Has Dismantled More Monuments Than Any Protest: Trump has done the most damage to national monuments, dismantling or desecrating four federally protected land and water sites with significant cultural, archeological and natural resources.

Other

These stories didn’t fit in a previous category, but I think it’s important to include…
A new Trump administration proposal would let government-funded, single-sex homeless shelters keep transgender people out for religious reasons, and advocates worry that could subject them to more violence than they already face.
In the past, Secretary Carson has called transgender women “big, hairy men” intruding on women’s shelters and referred to “Biblical principles” to justify misgendering transgender women.
President Trump has taken aim at an Obama-era program intended to eliminate racial housing disparities in the suburbs, a move proponents of the policy see as an attempt to shore up his sagging support among white suburban voters by stoking racial division.
The Trump administration is in discussions to end a decades-old practice of informally notifying Congress of major arms sales to foreign countries… Administration officials say they are tired of regular efforts by Capitol Hill to review arms exports to Saudi Arabia and other nations.
The White House asked a Republican senator to block a bill that punishes China over its encroachments in Hong Kong. That senator, Kevin Cramer, obliged, blocking unanimous passage of the bill last week — even though he’s a co-sponsor of it.
submitted by rusticgorilla to Keep_Track [link] [comments]


2020.07.05 20:18 LearningIsListening A not-so-brief rundown of letters D-F in Jeffrey Epstein's 'Little Black Book'

Below is a rundown of letters D-F of Epstein's contacts. Last year, I wrote about letters A-C. You can check that out here (https://www.reddit.com/conspiracy/comments/cpis3n/a_brief_rundown_of_the_first_ten_pages_of_jeffrey/). There are some misspelled names. Epstein entered their names like this.
I have bolded some of the more interesting connections and information, but there could be much more that I overlooked. I hope something here strikes an interest in someone and maybe we can get more investigations out of this. Please, if you know anything more about any of these people than what is presented here, post below. I am working off of the unredacted black book found here: https://www.coreysdigs.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Jeffrey-Epsteins-Little-Black-Book-unredacted.pdf
D-F
d’abo, Henri & Tatiana: John Henry Erland d’Abo is the grandson of the 9th Duke of Rutland (more info on what these titles all mean can be found here: https://www.debretts.com/expertise/essential-guide-to-the-peerage/what-is-the-peerage/). Tatjana is his wife. Henry is the chairman of Wilton Payments Ltd, a private company that helps with financial intermediation. He and Christopher O’Neill are the primary shareholders of the company. O’Neill is Tatjana’s half-brother, a British-American financier, and husband to Princess Madeleine, Duchess of Hälsingland and Gästrikland, a daughter of King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden.
d’abo, Mrs. Jennifer: British entrepreneur who passed away in 2003. d’Abo was once married to Peter Cadbury from the family of the famous chocolate company. Peter did not work for the company, but he and Jennifer d’Abo had a son together. Their son, Joel Cadbury, became owner of the Groucho Club, a watering hole often frequented by famous people. Three years after Cadbury sold the club, their website became the center of a child pornography scandal (link to story: https://www.sott.net/article/242698-Groucho-Clubs-website-forum-hit-by-child-pornography-scandal)
D’Alessie, Carman: This name turned up no results, however, we can safely assume that this is actually Carmen D’Alessio, the international nightlife guru who helped spawn Studio 54 and other famous clubs. She is a party legend with countless celebrity ties.
d’Arenberg, Prince Pierre: Family lineage can be traced back 1000 years. European royalty. Extremely wealthy not because of his ties to nobility, but because his mother, Margaret Bedford, was an heiress to Standard Oil (Exxon).
d’Uzes, Jacques De crussol: The 17th Duke of Uzes. Not much else found on him. Margaret Bedford married into his family shortly after her divorce with Prince Charles Auguste Armand d’Arenberg, father of Prince Pierre d’Arenberg.
Dabbagh, Amr A.: A wealthy businessman/investor from Saudi Arabia. Dabbagh recently faced corruption charges but settled with the Saudi Arabian government. Has ties all around the world, as he is a member of and/or serves/served on the boards of the World Economic Forum, London Business School, Cleveland Clinic, Jeddah Economic Forum, Harvard Institute for Social and Economic Policy in the Middle East, etc.
Dahl, Sophie: ‘90s-’00s model-turned-author and maternal granddaughter of famous author Roald Dahl (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Matilda, James and the Giant Peach, etc.) Dahl has been seen in photos with Ghislaine Maxwell.
Darrin, Drake: Not much information found. Darrin runs an investment group out of Greenwich, Connecticut. Lived about a mile away from Epstein in NYC.
Dartmouth, William: The 10th Earl of Dartmouth. Member of the European Parliament from 2009-2019. Became a stepbrother of Princess Diana when his mother embarked on a 2nd marriage with Diana’s father, John Spencer.
Davies, Jeff: Most likely refers to the current CFO for Legal & General Group. Davies was once a senior partner at Ernst & Young.
Davies, David & Linda: Sir David Davies is a wealthy banker and businessman with deep connections. A family friend introduced him to David Rockefeller back in the ‘60s, which helped him get his start. Linda, daughter of a Chinese-Malaysian tycoon, is his second wife. They were married for over 20 years but are now divorced.
Davis, Michael: A current partner at N3 Media, Davis has had many jobs. He started out working at CAA, one of the top agencies in the world. Check out this list of celebrities and athletes that they represent (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Creative_Artists_Agency_clients). Davis then went on to produce movies and TV shows before transitioning to digital media.
Day, Nick and Heather: Not much to be found on these two. There are several articles that speak of their ranch in Kenya. Apparently, it is a fairly popular spot where people stay to get some rest and solitude.
de Andrade, Marcelo: An international banker (not the serial killer) who lives within one mile of Epstein’s mansion in NYC. de Andrade was married to Lisa Bjornson, a successful banker and higher-up at J.P. Morgan Securities back in the ‘90s.
de Baecque, Patrick: de Baecque has his hands in online news media (lefigaro.fr) in France. de Baecque was named Director of Sales and Operations at Dolead in 2017. Dolead is a company that is involved with online marketing.
de Cabrol, Milly: A high-end interior designer based out of NYC.
De Cadenet, Alen: Alain de Cadenet is one of Epstein’s many Formula One contacts. Someone here probably knows more about de Cadenet, but he used to be a racecar driver and now works for ESPN and the Speed Channel as a host.
de Clermont-Tonnerre, Hermine: A French princess who used to have a penchant for partying. The only daughter of Charles Henri, 11th Duke of Clermont-Tonnerre, Hermine was one of 500 guests invited to Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother’s 100th birthday back in 2000. Hermine got in a motorcycle crash a month ago that put her in a coma.
De Georgiou, Anouska: A former British Playboy model who claims that Epstein groomed and raped her as a teenager when she met him in the 1990s. Her experience with Epstein is detailed in this article (https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/9974171/anouska-de-georgiou-jeffrey-epstein-rape-claims-nbc-playboy/). She speaks about how Epstein was able to lure her into the life as a young girl.
De Soto, Fernando: Very difficult to pinpoint. Best guess is that this is the Head of Real Estate at Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer in Madrid, Spain. I could be wrong, but this is the one that made the most sense.
Dedieu, Jean & Paulette: Nothing found.
Del Bono, Luca: Co-founder of Quintessentially Group, a hospitality group that specializes in leisure, travel, and tourism.
Dell, Adam: Brother of Michael Dell (Founder of Dell Technologies and 27th ranked richest person in the world in Forbes’s BS rankings that discount the elite families). Adam is a venture capitalist who has a baby with Padma Lakshmi.
Deluca Dina & Fouard Chartuuni: Fouad Chartouni is the president of Kensico Properties, a real-estate holding company in New York. Chartouni and his brother own the Lowell Hotel in New York. The Lowell is a high-end 5 star hotel that caters largely to film executives, fashion design CEOs, publishing CEOs, and financial CEOs. Madonna lived there for nearly a year after breaking up with Sean Penn. Dina Deluca is Chartouni’s wife. She used to work as an assistant in film and television, but now focuses on her DDC28 brand of bath and beauty products.
Derby Earl / Cntess Cass & Ted: Edward Stanley (known informally as Teddy) is the 19th Earl of Derby. Caroline Stanley is Ted’s wife. She was a socialite during the ‘90s and is the daughter of Robin Neville, the 10th Baron Braybrooke.
Derby, Ros & Jonathan: No info found.
Di Vita, Charlotte: Best known for her handcrafted teapots, di Vita started off as a volunteer who helped raise funds to help poor people, most notably in Kenya, Thailand, and Brazil. She helped locals grow food and even helped build 3 schools (37 teachers, 1100 students) through a charity, Trade plus Aid, in Bawku, Ghana, in 1995.
Dickenson, Debbie: Supermodel and actress. Sister of the more famous Janice Dickinson.
Dickinson, Janice: One of the most successful models of the ‘70s and ‘80s, Dickinson has been occasionally labeled as the first ever supermodel. Opened her own modeling agency in 2005. Ironically, she accused Bill Cosby of raping her back in 1982 and wrote about it in her memoir. When called to the stand during Cosby’s trial, Cosby’s lawyer pointed out the differences between Dickinson’s testimony and her account of the incident in her memoir. Dickinson said that her accusations of Cosby raping her while under oath were the absolute truth, while she took “poetic license” with some of the details in her memoir.
Dietrich Marc Antoine and Cath: Baron Marc-Antoine de Dietrich is a businessman. He resigned as director of Vossloh Cogifer in 2011.
Dietrich, Paul & Laura: Paul is Chief Investment Officer of Fairfax Global Markets LLC. They manage investments for private investors, retirement funds, and private institutions.
Dimbelby, Johnathan: Jonathan Dimbleby is a famous British reporter, political radio and television show host, and author.
Diniz, Pedro: Former Formula One driver and businessman. Now runs a large scale organic farm in Brazil.
Dixon, Alexandra: No info found.
Djerassi, Dale: Film producer and private investor who was married to Ghislaine Maxwell’s sister, Isabel, from 1984-1989.
Dolbey, Alex & Suzie: Suzie Dolbey (nee Murray-Philipson) is the daughter of the recently deceased Robin Murray-Philipson, who was the descendant of the Viscounts Elibank. Alex Dolbey has been the director of several management and investment companies.
Donne, Alegra: Couldn’t find much except a bunch of pictures of her hobnobbing at fancy parties. Actual name is Maria Allegra Donn.
Dori: Dori Cooperman is a socialite blogger who is friends with Alex von Furstenberg, Lindsay Lohan, Paris Hilton, among others. Daughter of Edwin Cooperman, former Chairman of Travelers Bank Group. Used to work for the famous publicist, Lizzie Grubman, who has represented Jay-Z, Britney Spears, and the Backstreet Boys. Cooperman is known for getting into trouble due to issues with drugs and alcohol.
Dorrit: Dorrit Moussaieff is an Israeli jewellery designer, editor, and businesswoman who married into royalty. Dorrit was the First Lady of Iceland from 2003-2016 after marrying President Olafur Ragnar Grimsson in 2000. Although Moussaieff claims that Epstein only had her phone number because they “lived on the same street in London sometime between 1978 and 1983,” the Daily Mail published a picture of her and her husband, President Olafur Ragnar Grimsson, with Ghislaine Maxwell.
Doss, David & Christy Prunier: David Doss has worked as producer and/or executive producer on NBC Nightly News with Tom Brokaw, NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt, Oprah in Africa, Primetime (with Diane Sawyer), Anderson Cooper 360, and Live PD. Doss now serves as senior VP of news programming for Al Jazeera America. Christy Prunier is a former Hollywood exec and founder of the Willa brand of beauty products.
Douglas, Diandra: Actor Michael Douglas’s first wife.
Dr. Eli Wiesel: Most likely Elie Wiesel, the famous Holocaust survivor and Jewish author of Night**. Wiesel was accused of sexual assault in 2017 (source:** https://www.newsweek.com/elie-wiesel-me-too-account-690891)
Drax, Jeremy: Founder of Parham Holdings, a London property operation.
Dreesmann, Bernard: Executive Chairman of Morleys department stores in London.
Driver, Minnie: Famous movie and television actress.
Dubb, Anthony V.: Dub is an investment banker and founder of Indigo Capital, LLC.
Dubbens, Peter: Peter Dubens is a British Internet entrepreneur and investor. Founder of Oakley Capital.
Dubin, Glen: Glenn Dubin is a billionaire hedge fund manager. There is a great article detailing Dubin and his wife’s relationship with Epstein here: https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2019/09/glenn-dubin-epstein-questions). Summary of the article: Dubin was the first one accused by Epstein victim Virginia Giuffre. Rinaldo Rizzo, Dubin’s chef, testified that sexual activities occurred between Dubin and a 15-year-old girl, which led to him and his wife quitting as personal chefs of the Dubins. Dubin’s wife, Dr. Eva Andersson-Dubin, dated Epstein for a long time before she married Dubin. The couple was so close with Epstein that even after Epstein was convicted in 2008 and officially a registered sex offender, they invited him to Thanksgiving dinner and wrote a letter to his probation officer that they trusted him around their children, who were all minors at the time. Multiple sources say Epstein was actually their children’s Godfather, but a spokesman for the couple denies it. Glen Dubin and Epstein helped each other with their business ties, as well. Dubin also had other ties with Epstein (personal friends with Les Wexner and others). Dubin and his wife are definitely major players in the Epstein saga.
Dubin, Louis & Tiffany: Louis Dubin is a real estate developer specializing in upper-middle class condominiums. Has sold luxury condominiums to the likes of Charles Bronfman, who has ties to the Clintons, Wexner, and whose family were in the NXIUM cult. Tiffany Dubin is the stepdaughter of the now deceased billionaire, A. Alfred Taubman, the owner of Sotheby’s, a famous auction house in NYC that often hosts parties for the rich and famous.
Dubin, Peter: Epstein is/was a moron. This is the same Peter Dubens listed just above.
Duchess of York: Former wife of Prince Andrew. Mother of Princess Beatrice and Eugenie. God knows the stories she could tell. Rumor has it her toes still look like prunes to this day.
Ducrey-Giordano, Francisco: Likely the owner of General Vegetables out of Italy. No further info found.
Duesing, Paul: An interior architectural designer who has worked on luxury and personal resorts all around the world. Duesing claims Epstein tried to hire him to work on Epstein’s home on Epstein’s private island back in 2002, but Duesing declined because he didn’t like Epstein. Says he doesn’t even know how Epstein got his number in the first place. Perhaps it was Duesing’s ties with the royal family. He tells stories of getting the Queen Mother drunk, being close with Lord and Lady Lloyd, working on the home of Mohamed Al-Fayed, father of Dodi, Princess Diana’s boyfriend who died in the car crash with her.
Duke of York: Prince Andrew, the toe-sucking pedophile (allegedly), himself. Photographed with victims, Epstein, and Maxwell many times over. His reputation has been completely crushed.
Dunbar Johnson Miranda & Steph: Stephen Dunbar-Johnson is the president, International of the New York Times Company. He oversees the strategic development of the Times Company’s international businesses. He also spent 12 years working at The Financial Times. Miranda Dunbar-Johnson is Stephen’s wife. She serves on The Paris Committee, which “plays a crucial role in increasing Human Rights Watch’s visibility in France.” David de Rothschild is on the honorary committee.
Dunne, Griffin: An actor, producer, and director best known for his role as Jack in An American Werewolf in London (1981).
Dunne, Philip & Dominice: Philip Dunne is a Conservative Party politician who has been a Member of Parliament since 2005. Domenica is his wife.
Duong, Anh: An artist, actress, and model best known for her self-portraits and her portraits of art collectors and influencers. As a model, Duong has worked for Dolce & Gabbana, Christian Dior, Donna Karan, Karl Lagerfield, Moschino, Yohji Yamamoto, and others.
Durso Luigi: Luigi d’Urso was a noble and Italian railroad executive who died in 2006. His grandfather was the 9th Duke di Cassano. His mother was the great-granddaughter of George Clymer, one of the founding fathers of the U.S. and signee of both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. d’Urso was also married to French designer and model Ines de la Fressange.
Duthie, John & Charlotte: John is primarily a television director based out of London. Duthie also won some poker tournaments against some of the world’s best players in the early 2000s. His wife, Charlotte played a big role in Sir James Goldsmith’s political career as a member of the Referendum Party back in 1997. Goldsmith received 3.5% of the vote in Putney, a constituency located in London.
Dzhabrailou, Umar: Umar Dzhabrailov is a Russian politician and advisor to Sergei Prikhodko, the current First Deputy Head of the Russian Government Office and Deputy Prime Minister of Russia in Dmitry Medvedev’s Cabinet. Dzhabrailov was rumored to be romantically linked to Naomi Campbell, supermodel and one of the main suspects in Epstein’s underage sex scandal, in the early 2000s. Dzhabrailov, a supremely wealthy businessman, ran for president in 2000, garnering 0.1% of the vote as an Independent. Dzhabrailov was a partner in Russia’s Radisson Hotel along with American entrepreneur Paul Tatum. After their falling out in 1996, Tatum was shot and killed. Some think Dzhabrailov was responsible while others think he was set up.
Ecclestone, Bernie: A billionaire British business magnate and former chief executive of Formula One Group. Ecclestone has faced some minimal controversies for tax evasion, bribery, and saying that Hitler was a man who was “able to get things done.” Disgustingly enough, Ecclestone, at the age of 89, became a father to his first son, Ace, on July 1, 2020.
Eckon, Paul: Paul Ekon is an international investor and venture capitalist who allegedly fled South Africa in the mid-90s because he was being investigated for links to a gold-smuggling syndicate. Has strong ties to South Africa, including being a personal friend of former president, Thabo Mbeki.
Edsel, Lucinda: No info found.
Edwards, Andrew & Tracy: Unsure. There was an Andrew Edwards and Tracy Edwards on linkedin who have a background in finance, but it is not conclusive whether or not they are the ones listed here or if they are even married. There is also a Tracy Edwards who is a former British sailor who used to work as a Project Manager for Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP) and now teaches children of Internet safety and online reputation. This would be a far more interesting connection, but I cannot find anyone by the name of Andrew with a relevant relationship to her.
Ellan, Johnathan: No info found. Given his email, likely an employee of Starwood Capital Group, a private investment firm that is widely known for their luxury hotels. Starwood also specializes in real estate and energy.
Elias, Brian: A Miami Beach attorney.
Eliasch, Johan & Amanda: Johan is a Swedish billionaire businessman whose company, Gethal, was fined for alleged deforestation of the Amazon in 2008. The charges were dropped. Amanda is his ex-wife.
Elingworth, Charlie & Amanda: Charles Ellingworth is an author, businessman, and director of several real estate companies, most notably Cadogan Group, which owns most of the property in Chelsea, an affluent area in Central London.
Elizabeth: Not enough info.
Ellenbogen, Eric: An entertainment exec of Classic Media (a subsidiary of Dreamworks) and former CEO of Marvel Enterprises.
Ellingworth, Mr. & Mrs.: Charlie and Amanda listed just above.
Elliot, Ben: Current Co-Chairman of the Conservative Party in the UK and nephew of Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (Prince Charles’s current wife). Elliot is also co-founder of Quintessentially Group, a hospitality group that specializes in leisure, travel, and tourism. Epstein has several ties to this group. Elliot’s spokesman has said that Elliot never met Epstein. However, Elliot has been a dinner guest of Ghislaine Maxwell in New York.
Elliott, Gail & Joe Coffey: Gail Elliott is an English fashion designer and former model. Joe Coffey is her husband and co-owner of their fashion brand, Little Joe Woman.
Ellison, Mandy & Ralph: Ralph Ellison is a pharmaceutical executive and investor. He was CEO of DOR BioPharma Inc., now known as Soligenix Inc. a company focused on treating rare diseases. Soligenix came under scrutiny two years ago when they were accused of ripping off stockholders.
Elwes, Anabel: Not much information to be found on Annabel Elwes, although it is clear that she runs in elite circles. Back in 1997, Elwes organized the Hong Kong handover party in order to aid the Hong Kong Cancer Fund. Guests included Anthony de Rothschild (eldest son of Evelyn de Rothschild); James Hewitt (former cavalry officer who revealed that he had an affair with Princess Diana while she was with Prince Charles. Possibly the biological father of Prince Harry, if rumors are to be believed); actress Isla Fisher of Wedding Crashers fame; socialite Tamara Beckwith; and Bassam Debs (listed in the Panama Papers).
Epstein, Ed: An investigative journalist and friend of Epstein. Denies any knowledge of Epstein’s penchant for underage girls.
Erba Noona: Noona Smith-Petersen is a public relations executive who has worked for Giorgio Armani, Valentino, Calvin Klein, and Tod’s. She now owns her own PR firm. Noona is married to Enrico Erba, who is a client manager for Giorgio Armani.
Espirito, Santo, Manuel and Ros: Manuel Espirito Santo is likely an heiemployee of the Portuguese banking cartel, Espirito Santo, which received a major bailout in 2014.
Estlin, Jean-Marc: Jean-Marc Etlin is a banker and current partner in CVC Capital Partners, one of the world’s largest private equity and investment advisory firms.
Estrada, Juffali, Christina: Christina Estrada is a former Pirelli Calendar model and ex-wife (2001-2014) of Saudi billionaire heir and businessman, Walid Juffali. She received a £75 million settlement after their divorce.
Evans, Chris: Not the Captain America Chris Evans, but the UK television host and radio DJ. Evans has been rumored to often “flash” people at work (source: https://www.insider.com/police-build-case-on-chris-evans-sexual-assault-claim-2016-7). The BBC has also refused to investigate claims from an ex-Top Gear presenter that Evans “grabbed her breasts and touched himself.” When Evans was 35, he married 18-year-old pop star Billie Piper. They eventually separated and divorced years later.
Eveheart, Angie: Angie Everheart was one of the most well-known models of the 1990s. She has accused Harvey Weinstein of masturbating in front of her.
Faber, David: Due to the London area phone number listed, this is likely the former Conservative member of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. His maternal grandfather, Harold Macmillan, was Prime Minister of the UK from 1957-1963. As of 2010, Faber was to become head of Summer Fields, his former prep school. Summer Fields, an exclusive all-boys prep school, has come under scrutiny in the past. Tom Parker Bowles, son of Camilla Duchess of Cornwall (Prince Charles’s wife), has claimed that Summer Fields was “a hotbed of the sorts of things that are coming out now,” according to this article (https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2812235/Tom-Parker-Bowles-former-headmaster-dismisses-food-writer-s-claims-old-primary-school-hotbed-impropriety-complete-rubbish.html) from the Daily Mail published in 2014. Parker Bowles went on to claim that one master would join naked boys in the shower.
Faber, Sally & Brook Johnson: Charles “Brook” Johnson is a millionaire UK businessman and polo player. His wife, Sally Faber was a weather girl in the 1980s and former wife of former David Faber (listed above). They live next door to Prince Charles in Highgrove.
Faibairn, Charlotte: Charlotte Fairbairn is an author who has worked in the arts, politics, and journalism. Most importantly, she is the eldest daughter of Sir Nicholas Fairbairn (1933-1995), a Scottish politician and former legal adviser to Margaret Thatcher, who was posthumously accused of child molestation and sexual assault against an adult female. Sir Nicholas’s name was allegedly on a list of VIPs who attended parties at an underage boys brothel in the 1980s with Cyril Smith, another British government official and alleged serial sex offender. More info can be found on both here: https://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/sir-nicholas-fairbairn-child-abuse-scandal-link-1531718 and here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyril_Smith
Fairfax, The Hon Rupert: Hon. Rupert Alexander James Fairfax is the son of Thomas Brian McElvie Fairfax, 13th Lord of Fairfax of Cameron. Rupert is currently Managing Director of Fairfax Saddles, which was awarded the Queen’s Award for Innovation in 2018. This is the highest business award in the UK.
Fairweather, Natasha: A well-known literary agent who was the literary editor of The Moscow Times and writereviewer for the London Times and The Economist.
Fairweather, Ms. Catherine: Former travel editor at Harper’s Bazaar and Porter. Married to photojournalist Don McCullin. McCullin co-wrote The Palestinians with Jonathan Dimbleby, another Epstein associate listed above.
Fairweather, Ambassador & Lady: Sir Patrick Fairweather is a retired British diplomat. He worked as Ambassador to Angola (1985-1987), Italy (1992-1996), and Albania (1992-1996). Lady Maria Fairweather was a linguist and professional interpreter who once helped out Bill Clinton and Boris Yeltsin when the official interpreter disappeared at a crucial moment just before the commencement of the G7 Summit.
Fakhre, Armado & Jasmine: Amado Fakhre is the British-Argentinian Founder and former CEO of Coral Capital, a Havana-based investment group best known for its joint venture partner in Havana’s upscale Saratoga Hotel. Fakhre was arrested for corruption and Coral Capital was forced to shut its doors in Havana. Fakhre was interrogated for 20 months in a Cuban safe house and eventually got sentenced to 5-7 years for bribery, but did not have to serve any time. No explanation has been given. Jasmine is his wife.
Fakhre, Danny & Christine: Danny Fakhre is the Chairman of Kochii Oil out of Australia. Christiane is his wife.
Fall, Meredith: No info found.
Fallah, Mrs: Likely Gina Fallah, mother of Christina Fallah. Gina’s father was Reza Fallah, an Iranian businessman and political advisor.
Fallah, Ms. Christina & Jon Robe: Christina Fallah is an interior designer and owner of Christina Fallah designs.
Falletans, Olivier de: Managing partner at Bryan, Olivier, & Co., a mid-market investment bank in Technology. Olivier comes from a family of nobility dating back to at least the 13th century.
Fanjul, Pepe: Jose “Pepe” Fanjul is a billionaire businessman involved in sugar and real estate. Vice Chairman and President of Flo-Sun. “Pepe” is a Republican. He was one of the largest contributors to George W. Bush’s campaign, is an ardent supporter of Marco Rubio, and co-hosted a large fundraiser for Donald Trump. His older brother, Alfonso Fanjul Jr., is a Democrat and was a co-chair of Bill Clinton’s Florida campaign, further proving that POLITICAL PARTISANSHIP IS A CROCK OF SHIT.
Faulkner, Terence & Cornelia: Terence Faulkner is Chairman of Leathams PLC, a London-based food distributor. Cornelia is Terence’s wife. She is Director of Leathams and a specialist decorator.
Feeley, Fiona: An interior designer at Atelier Designs.
Fekkai, Frederic: A French celebrity hairstylist.
Feldman, Andrew: Orthopaedic surgeon in New York City.
Felix, Helena: Not much to be found on Helena. She was possibly the director of an investment firm called Edenhaven Limited. Her husband, Peter, was an oral surgeon. He passed away in 2011.
Fell, David & Anne: Nothing much found here. After a lot of digging, it turns out that David Fell lives in an apartment at 1177 Avenue of the Americas, a real estate holding of Larry Silverstein, owner of the World Trade Center who (allegedly) took out insurance on the WTC just before 9/11.
Ferragamo, Leonardo & Beatrice: Leonardo is the son of Salvatore Ferragamo, the creator of Salvatore Ferragamo, S.p.A., an Italian luxury goods company specializing in shoes, leather goods, and watches.
Ferranti, Hugo: Hugo de Ferranti is an art dealer. He is also a Director for Action on Addiction, a UK-based charity for people with drug and alcohol addiction issues. Kate Middleton has served as patron of Action on Addiction since 2012.
Ferry, Brian: Bryan Ferry is a singesongwriter and the owner of Studio One recording studio in London. In the 1970s, he was the frontman for the British rock band, Roxy Music.
Fiennes, Martin: The heir apparent to the Baron Saye and Sele, a title of peerage in England. Lives in Broughton Castle. Cousin of actor Ralph Fiennes.
Fiennes, Martin: Same person.
Fiennes, Ralph: Famous actor. Cousin of Martin Fiennes. The fact that Epstein knows so many people in this family is troubling.
Fiennes, Suzzana: A British artist who works exclusively with Prince Charles. Susannah is the twin sister of Martin Fiennes and cousin of actor Ralph.
Fifer, Chuck: Not positive, but could be actor Chuck Pfeiffer, who is a close friend of Oliver Stone and was in Wall Street with Michael Douglas. However, it could be someone else. Pfeiffer didn’t have much of an acting career.
Figg, Christopher & Charlotte: Christopher Figg is a movie producer and CEO of Piccadilly Pictures. Figg is best known for producing the first 3 Hellraiser movies, Trainspotting, Dog Soldiers, Heidi, Coriolanus (directed by and starring Ralph Fiennes), We Need to Talk About Kevin, and many others. Charlotte is his wife.
Finch Charles: A failed director who became a talent agent for William Morris. Oversees a private equity finance unit called Finch Asia and is Chairman of Dean & Deluca (66 stores nationwide). Most notably, Charles Finch is known to host extravagant, A-list laden parties at Cannes, home of the world-famous film festival, pre-Oscar parties, and pre-BAFTA parties. There is an in-depth article from the Hollywood Reporter about Finch and his Cannes parties here (https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/meet-charles-finch-ultimate-cannes-party-host-you-need-know-1001847). Regulaoccasional guests of his Cannes parties included: Harvey Weinstein, Rush Hour director Brett Ratner (accused of sexual abuse by 6 women, including actress Olivia Munn and actress/model Natasha Henstridge), Mick Jagger, and Netflix bigwig Ted Sarandos. Finch’s pre-Oscar and pre-BAFTA parties have attracted the likes of Jeff Bezos, Robert De Niro, Sofia Coppola, Pedro Almodovar, Margot Robbie, Rashida Jones (daughter of Quincy Jones, music mogul who has been accused of nefarious sexual endeavors), Tracee Ellis Ross, and others Finch is the son of famous actor Peter Finch (A-list actor from the 1960s-1970s, best known for his role in the movie Network, for which he won an Oscar for Best Actor) and Yolande Turner (actress). A deeper look into Finch’s parties and connections would definitely prove interesting.
Finklestein, Howard: Finkelstein is a public defender in Broward County, Florida. In Florida (and some other states), public defenders are elected, not appointed.
Firyal Princess: Jerusalem-born Jordanian princess who was once married to Prince Muhammad bin Talal. Firyal was named an UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador in 1992. Princess Firyal launched the International Hope Foundation in 1994 for the benefit of homeless and street children. Firyal holds positions with several museums (The Louvre, The Tate, MOMA, and Guggenheim), as well as positions with Columbia University, New York Public Library, United Nation Association, and International Rescue Committee.
Fisher, Dan: Given the address listed (Trump Tower), it is possible that this is a former lobbyist (https://www.citizen.org/news/36-former-lobbyists-working-trump-clear-conflicts-interest/) and current Special Assistant to the President and Director of the White House Visitors Office, however I am unable to confirm this information with 100% certainty.
Flick Mook: Likely Friedrich Christian Flick, known as Mick Flick. The Flick family was a billionaire coal and steel conglomerate that was accused of war crimes during the Holocaust. Flick’s grandfather financially supported the Nazi Party and used 48,000 forced laborers from the concentration camps, many of whom died due to the conditions. Grandfather Flick was found guilty of war crimes at Nuremberg and served 3 years of his 7-year sentence. Mick (Mook) sold most of his holdings in the ‘80s and retired a billionaire.
Foman, Bobby & Jeanette: Robert Q. Fomon currently works as a Managing Director for Morgan Stanley. He specializes in wealth management. He used to be an Assistant Director at Bear Stearns (owned by Chase), one of the investment banks that went under as a result of the 2008 financial crisis. His father is. Robert M. Fomon, Jeanette is his wife. D-F continued below....
submitted by LearningIsListening to conspiracy [link] [comments]


2020.06.11 17:07 Korinthe Universal Credit Misadministration

Hello all, my wife and I find ourselves in an incredibly stressful situation and are looking for advice.
I am a (disabled) mature university student with a wife and children to support. This means that I receive a full Maintenance Loan from Student Finance England, on top of a Tuiton Fee Loan which is then supported by Universal Credits.
This is rather complicated to work out, because my Maintenance Loan from SFE only covers the time at which I am at university during the 2 semesters. During which period, our awarded Universal Credit is substantially lower as they consider this Loan as income (a separate issue, which is ridiculous, but I have included for full information). Outside of this period, our awarded Universal Credits is increased (but does in no way match) to fill the difference.
At the start of last month, my wife contacted Universal Credits by phone to confirm what money we will be receiving, as it was our last month that my Maintenance Loan covers before the adjustment to our Universal Credit is made - think of it as the transition period. My wife was told eveything looked fine and to expect the right amount of money that she had already worked out.
A week later when we were due to be paid our Universal Credit, my instantly noticed that it was £1400 lower than it should have been. This number is very important and my knew right away what had happened - Universal Credits had failed to adjust our money correctly with regards to my Maintenance Loan. Instead of factoring it over an 8 month cycle they did it over a 9 month cycle.
My wife attempted to contact them over our online Journal, along with requesting phone calls multiple times. We received no response for 2 weeks. At which point we got our local MP involved which seemed to move things a long a bit.
Here is a quick summary of our problems now:
They aren't currently disclosing how much, but my wife has worked it out to around £11000. That is a monumental amount, and it is through absolutely no fault of our own. We were one of the first families forced onto Universal Credits in our area, even the agents we dealt with at the job centre didn't know what was going on or how to deal with our case during the initial setting up of our account. We provided any and all information correctly and as asked for, and assumed that anything we were awarded was correct - they are the 'experts' and keepers of knowledge in this relationship.
This money is from 2 years ago and has been spent. Universal Credits have had to re-assess our money multiple times within these two years and have failed to notice any problems this entire time. Their incompetence is on clear sight, even the amount they gave us a couple weeks ago was incorrect!
Where do we stand legally on this matter? I refuse to have a £11000 debt hang over my head and my credit score because of multiple fuck ups by Universal Credits. We received so little money this year that I had to apply to my university for hardship and was awarded a substantial sum. We simply can not afford to pay this, and it is through no fault of our own.
submitted by Korinthe to DWPhelp [link] [comments]


2020.06.11 17:00 Korinthe Universal Credit Misadministration

Hello all, my wife and I find ourselves in an incredibly stressful situation and are looking for advice.
I am a (disabled) mature university student with a wife and children to support. This means that I receive a full Maintenance Loan from Student Finance England, on top of a Tuiton Fee Loan which is then supported by Universal Credits.
This is rather complicated to work out, because my Maintenance Loan from SFE only covers the time at which I am at university during the 2 semesters. During which period, our awarded Universal Credit is substantially lower as they consider this Loan as income (a separate issue, which is ridiculous, but I have included for full information). Outside of this period, our awarded Universal Credits is increased (but does in no way match) to fill the difference.
At the start of last month, my wife contacted Universal Credits by phone to confirm what money we will be receiving, as it was our last month that my Maintenance Loan covers before the adjustment to our Universal Credit is made - think of it as the transition period. My wife was told eveything looked fine and to expect the right amount of money that she had already worked out.
A week later when we were due to be paid our Universal Credit, my instantly noticed that it was £1400 lower than it should have been. This number is very important and my knew right away what had happened - Universal Credits had failed to adjust our money correctly with regards to my Maintenance Loan. Instead of factoring it over an 8 month cycle they did it over a 9 month cycle.
My wife attempted to contact them over our online Journal, along with requesting phone calls multiple times. We received no response for 2 weeks. At which point we got our local MP involved which seemed to move things a long a bit.
Here is a quick summary of our problems now:
They aren't currently disclosing how much, but my wife has worked it out to around £11000. That is a monumental amount, and it is through absolutely no fault of our own. We were one of the first families forced onto Universal Credits in our area, even the agents we dealt with at the job centre didn't know what was going on or how to deal with our case during the initial setting up of our account. We provided any and all information correctly and as asked for, and assumed that anything we were awarded was correct - they are the 'experts' and keepers of knowledge in this relationship.
This money is from 2 years ago and has been spent. Universal Credits have had to re-assess our money multiple times within these two years and have failed to notice any problems this entire time. Their incompetence is on clear sight, even the amount they gave us a couple weeks ago was incorrect!
Where do we stand legally on this matter? I refuse to have a £11000 debt hang over my head and my credit score because of multiple fuck ups by Universal Credits. We received so little money this year that I had to apply to my university for hardship and was awarded a substantial sum. We simply can not afford to pay this, and it is through no fault of our own.
submitted by Korinthe to LegalAdviceUK [link] [comments]


2020.05.14 18:32 PM_ME_VAPORWAVE M/22 - NEET for four years. Can I have some advice please?

[M/22] NEET for four years now and I am starting to loose it
I posted this in UK personal finance and /findapath however I’m hoping that this subreddit might be helpful as well?
This will be very incoherent as I am in an absolute fucking state but here goes nothing.
Bit of backstory here:-
So I’ve always been a massive goody two shoes in school. I always did all my homework at school and always tried my hardest.
I wasn’t most academic person but the intention was always that my life would go:-
Try hard in school Try hard at university Get good job Retire Die
Anyway that hasn’t happened. So basically back through my GCSEs (2011-2013) and even everything before that went fine. Then I started my A Levels in the summer of 2013 and things started to go wrong.
Like very wrong.
I was really stressing out as I was doing far too many coursework subjects and I was doing too much work on my A Levels. I was staying up to 1am trying to get all the work done which I am aware is far too much work for an A Level student to be doing. I got some general time management help from my teachers but it wasn’t very helpful. I should have dropped one of my subjects but unfortunately I didn’t do that and assumed that I was just stressed and that I would get used to the pressure of A Levels. This was in the October of 2013.
My internet addiction also got a LOT, LOT worse after the first half term of my first year of A Levels which has been a constant factor during this time period.
During my A Levels my mental health and stress got worse and this culminated in March 2015 when I had to drop an A Level (History) which left me with two A Levels in Photography (A) and Media Studies (B).
During the summer my mental health was still in a mess and I started to get very depressed. I should have got mental health help during this time but I didn’t. I then started a foundation Diploma In art and Design (Film Pathway) which I hated, mainly because I didn’t know why I was doing it and because I was still depressed. I enjoyed the course (60% of it) and social life but I was in such a mess that I didn’t really know what I was doing or why I was doing the course.
Anyway, I passed my foundation course and I got some counselling for my mental health. I started volunteering as a filmmaker for various arts organisations which I liked, although it was all unpaid. This was from 2016-2017.
After that I then got in touch with a local organisation that was going to try and get me some sort of creative/media/digital type job in my local area which lead to nothing. Not even a work experience placement.
Since maybe the Christmas of 2017 I’ve basically done nothing aside from the occasional work experience programme (like one day long) which have been film related, working at the post office as a casual Mail Sorter, and a bit of volunteering at a charity shop.
I have applied for retail jobs at both Waitrose and Tesco multiple times and I have been rejected from both.
I also did counselling again in 2018 and it was helpful initially.
I have not been claiming JSA during the time I have been unemployed.
Part of the problem is that I hate being good at what I am good at. The intention was that I would always do some sort of film/media course (I did consider doing a history course but that dream died with my AS Level results) but unfortunately the pay after film and media degrees is diabolical and that assumes that I might even get a job when I finish which is unlikely given my work history and how competitive film/media industries are.
I also hate the fact that, despite working my arse off at A Level and literally making myself depressed as a result of doing all the school stuff I’m probably going to end up living in poverty certainly immediately after my degree finishes because of the dire amount that film and media degrees pay after graduation.
Being good at the creative subjects feels like a literal death sentence. Condemning myself to a life of poverty. I’m sick and tired of all my STEM friends getting 30k-35k jobs which they can walk into after graduation all because they can do maths. It’s like all my hard work was for nothing. A complete and utter waste of my time. I don’t think I can deal with all my hard work going to waste by me not getting a job after university again. Not to mention that people in the creative industries are more likely to kill themselves than others which needless to say probably isn’t a good idea considering that I have had mental health conditions in the past.
I have applied to university this year to do various media/film/post production courses but I don’t think I will be able to really cope at university hence I don’t want to go.
I have seen tonnes of careers advisors and they don’t really help me figure out what I want to do all they all say do film/media degrees and help for the best.
The only person who has said do anything aside from film/media was a careers advisor in March 2015 who said become an advertising art director however getting work experience in advertising seems to be impossible as most of the big agencies are London based (I am not) bad obviously I can’t start a vocational degree if I don’t know what the job entails afterwards.
I’ve applied for apprenticeships but I can’t get them as I’m too old and I have a Level 4 Qualification. The closest I ever got to getting an apprenticeship was when I was shortlisted for an interview as a Digital Designer at an advertising agency after I finished the volunteering but I didn’t get it as I forgot to send them an email saying so wanted the job. This was incredibly frustrating as I would have got that job easily and I would have absolutely loved it, even if I did something else after the apprenticeship.
I probably haven’t sent out as many application forms as I should but I am too scared to send out my application forms for jobs/work experience programmes etc because getting rejected will make me more depressed.
Please help.
submitted by PM_ME_VAPORWAVE to careerguidance [link] [comments]


2020.05.12 19:49 PM_ME_VAPORWAVE [M/22] NEET for four years now and I am starting to loose it

I posted this in UK personal finance however I’m hoping that this subreddit might be helpful as well?
This will be very incoherent as I am in an absolute fucking state but here goes nothing.
Bit of backstory here:-
So I’ve always been a massive goody two shoes in school. I always did all my homework at school and always tried my hardest.
I wasn’t most academic person but the intention was always that my life would go:-
Try hard in school Try hard at university Get good job Retire Die
Anyway that hasn’t happened. So basically back through my GCSEs (2011-2013) and even everything before that went fine. Then I started my A Levels in the summer of 2013 and things started to go wrong.
Like very wrong.
I was really stressing out as I was doing far too many coursework subjects and I was doing too much work on my A Levels. I was staying up to 1am trying to get all the work done which I am aware is far too much work for an A Level student to be doing. I got some general time management help from my teachers but it wasn’t very helpful. I should have dropped one of my subjects but unfortunately I didn’t do that and assumed that I was just stressed and that I would get used to the pressure of A Levels. This was in the October of 2013.
My internet addiction also got a LOT, LOT worse after the first half term of my first year of A Levels which has been a constant factor during this time period.
During my A Levels my mental health and stress got worse and this culminated in March 2015 when I had to drop an A Level (History) which left me with two A Levels in Photography (A) and Media Studies (B).
During the summer my mental health was still in a mess and I started to get very depressed. I should have got mental health help during this time but I didn’t. I then started a foundation Diploma In art and Design (Film Pathway) which I hated, mainly because I didn’t know why I was doing it and because I was still depressed. I enjoyed the course (60% of it) and social life but I was in such a mess that I didn’t really know what I was doing or why I was doing the course.
Anyway, I passed my foundation course and I got some counselling for my mental health. I started volunteering as a filmmaker for various arts organisations which I liked, although it was all unpaid. This was from 2016-2017.
After that I then got in touch with a local organisation that was going to try and get me some sort of creative/media/digital type job in my local area which lead to nothing. Not even a work experience placement.
Since maybe the Christmas of 2017 I’ve basically done nothing aside from the occasional work experience programme (like one day long) which have been film related, working at the post office as a casual Mail Sorter, and a bit of volunteering at a charity shop.
I have applied for retail jobs at both Waitrose and Tesco multiple times and I have been rejected from both.
I also did counselling again in 2018 and it was helpful initially.
I have not been claiming JSA during the time I have been unemployed.
Part of the problem is that I hate being good at what I am good at. The intention was that I would always do some sort of film/media course (I did consider doing a history course but that dream died with my AS Level results) but unfortunately the pay after film and media degrees is diabolical and that assumes that I might even get a job when I finish which is unlikely given my work history and how competitive film/media industries are.
I also hate the fact that, despite working my arse off at A Level and literally making myself depressed as a result of doing all the school stuff I’m probably going to end up living in poverty certainly immediately after my degree finishes because of the dire amount that film and media degrees pay after graduation.
Being good at the creative subjects feels like a literal death sentence. Condemning myself to a life of poverty. I’m sick and tired of all my STEM friends getting 30k-35k jobs which they can walk into after graduation all because they can do maths. It’s like all my hard work was for nothing. A complete and utter waste of my time. I don’t think I can deal with all my hard work going to waste by me not getting a job after university again. Not to mention that people in the creative industries are more likely to kill themselves than others which needless to say probably isn’t a good idea considering that I have had mental health conditions in the past.
I have applied to university this year to do various media/film/post production courses but I don’t think I will be able to really cope at university hence I don’t want to go.
I have seen tonnes of careers advisors and they don’t really help me figure out what I want to do all they all say do film/media degrees and help for the best.
The only person who has said do anything aside from film/media was a careers advisor in March 2015 who said become an advertising art director however getting work experience in advertising seems to be impossible as most of the big agencies are London based (I am not) bad obviously I can’t start a vocational degree if I don’t know what the job entails afterwards.
I’ve applied for apprenticeships but I can’t get them as I’m too old and I have a Level 4 Qualification. The closest I ever got to getting an apprenticeship was when I was shortlisted for an interview as a Digital Designer at an advertising agency after I finished the volunteering but I didn’t get it as I forgot to send them an email saying so wanted the job. This was incredibly frustrating as I would have got that job easily and I would have absolutely loved it, even if I did something else after the apprenticeship.
I probably haven’t sent out as many application forms as I should but I am too scared to send out my application forms for jobs/work experience programmes etc because getting rejected will make me more depressed.
Please help.
submitted by PM_ME_VAPORWAVE to findapath [link] [comments]


2020.05.06 11:08 ukuni180 I'm the US admissions rep for a UK Russell Group Unviersity - here is some general advice on studying in the UK.

As the title says - I am the lead US admissions officer ("International Officer") for a top UK university.
Hopefully I will be able to dispel some common misconceptions, and give you all something to think about.
Disclaimer: I will be speaking generally about UK admissions. Not everything I say will be applicable to every university (looking at you, Oxbridge) - but should be fairly accurate for most.
The United Kingdom Geography lesson time - The UK is made up of 4 constituent nations (for now anyway...) - England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. All four have distinct regional personalities, and each has excellent universities. Many US students think that the UK is made up of Oxbridge, London and St. Andrew's. Like the US, there are colleges for students of widely varying academic ability and financial means - please don't think that college is inaccessible to you because of perceptions of your grades and bank account.
UK college structure The UK has two main college systems: Scotland - 4 year degrees, similar to US model. 2 years of mixed curriculum, followed by 2 years of 'declared major'.
England, Wales, Northern Ireland - 3 year major. Major declared at point of application, no general education - just the subject you want to study.
The admissions process UK applications are done through a system called UCAS - which is essentially our Common App. It allows you to apply to up to 5 UK schools with one application, for one fee of £25 (roughly $30).
Your application consists of your high school diploma, test scores, a personal statement and a letter of recommendation.
Every university has different entry requirements - usually published on their website. Generally they will ask for an unweighted CGPA of 3.0/4 or above, either the SAT I or ACT, and 2 or 3 APs or Subject Tests. If you are pursuing a STEM discipline, they will ask for specific scores in specific APs/subject tests (e.g. Bio for Bio majors).
There is a notional application deadline of January 15th (October 15th for Oxbridge, medicine, dentistry) - but in reality we will accept applications all the way through to the summer. So yes, current seniors, applications are still open.
The personal statement This is quite different from a US college essay. For one, the same personal statement goes to all 5 colleges. This is indicative of the main difference between UK and US admissions is that UK admissions are purely merit-based and subject specific. We want to know if you're smart enough, and interested in your subject area.
To that end, your personal statement should be geared towards your subject, and nothing else. Extra-curriculars are valuable only where they have either direct relevance to your major, or demonstrate useful transferable skills. Loads more advice is available on the UCAS website.
Things we do not care about: - Demonstrated interest - Where you parents/siblings went to school - ECs that have no relevance to your strength as a student - How many times you email the admissions office
That's not to be harsh - we just want to ensure that offers are given to the most capable students, simply because they are capable.
Tuition Generally, the better ranked the University, the more expensive - but this has regional variation. However, all colleges in the UK (with one or two exceptions) are public universities - so prices will not be the eye-watering amounts expected at top US colleges. Generally tuition ranges from around £15,000 - £30,000 per year, before scholarships and discounts.
Living costs Vary wildly across the UK. London and the South of England (Oxbridge) are expensive. Think Bay Area/Manhattan expensive.
Other areas are much less so - Northern Ireland, Wales, North of England and Scotland (not Edinburgh) are much more affordable, and super high quality of life. There are vibrant, exciting cities, as well as smaller, rural campuses. Probably castles at every one of them. Many of the UK's smaller cities are really student focused - if you wouldn't want to live in Manhattan, you don't want to live in London.
Housing Every decent university will have guaranteed housing for international students. There is no room sharing in the UK - you will have your own bedroom, and usually your own en-suite bathroom. Having a stranger sleep next to you is a bizarre concept to Brits. It is generally of a very high quality - like living in a medium rate hotel.
Other costs Outside of tuition and housing, we don't expect you to pay for much. There are no book fees - we have libraries for that. Borrow books, for free. If you desperately want to buy a book, they are like £50-£60. No access codes for classes or any of that rubbish.
Finance You can apply US student loans (FAFSA) to study at most universities in the UK, exactly the same way as you would in the US. You just need to borrow a lot less because tuition and living are way cheaper here, and it's only 3 year majors for the most part.
Scholarships Most UK universities will offer some form of scholarships, but they will likely only cover a small proportion of the tuition fees. As I mentioned above, we're pretty much all public institutions, so we don't make a huge profit off your tuition - as such, we don't have the financial leeway to offer large financial aid packages. Hopefully the lower fees, lower living costs and shorter degrees make up for that.
Healthcare We have social healthcare in the UK. You will pay a health surcharge as part of your visa application which costs £300 ($400) per year. That covers all medical treatment you will ever need in the UK, including routine medication, pre-existing conditions, ER, ambulances - whatever. It's all free.
Student life There is no greek life. Organised fun is not very British/Scottish/Northern Irish/whatever. We have hundreds of student societies which are organised around interest groups - everything from debating to video games to veganism to The Earl Grey Tea society (??). Social life is very good at UK universities, it's just a bit... different.
The drinking age in the UK is 18. Do with that information what you will - but you don't need to risk getting arrested to have a good night out.
Safety The United Kingdom is an incredibly safe country. Guns are illegal - even the police don't carry them. Seriously.
Large cities like London come with the risks of large cities anywhere - petty crime, terrorism. But by and large, I feel much safer walking around at night in the UK than I do in the US. I love your country, but some of your cities are sketchy as hell after dark.
Outside of London/Manchester - cities are pretty great in the UK. Places like Belfast, Newcastle, Edinburgh have superb quality of life for low cost.
We also have rural and small-town campuses. Whatever your preference, there is probably an option for it.
Brexit Bloody Brexit. In short - here's what you need to know. Brexit is a disaster, but its impact on non-EU students is practically non-existant. The UK is still a diverse, thriving, welcoming country.
In reality, Brexit will be very good for US students. For one, the Dollar-Pound exchange rate has tilted about 20% in your favour - so everything is cheaper for you! Also, the UK will be re-introducing the Post Study Work Visa - which will allow graduates to remain in the UK to seek employment for 2 years after graduation. We have a skills gap to fill freshly vacated by our friends in the EU.
THIS SOUNDS GREAT, TELL ME MORE The best resource is people like me. Every UK university worth its salt will have someone like me whose entire job is to help US students apply. Google the university name and "USA" and you should get to the right info. Email us, we will answer all of the questions. Our admissions is merit based, so you can ask whatever level of stupid question you want, none of it matters!
I will be as active on this sub as my working time allows. Things are a little busy right now, as you can imagine, but I'm working from home for the forseeable future - so drop a comment or DM me if you need advice about studying in the UK.
It should go without saying, but this advice is of course free, and I'll do my best to be impartial - but I have a natural bias towards my own city and college!
submitted by ukuni180 to A2UK [link] [comments]


2020.04.30 09:25 elitecollegethroaway AMA: 20 Things I Wish I Knew Before Going to an Elite College

Hey there! I graduated from a mid-ranked Ivy a few years ago. Below is a list of 20 things I wish I knew before going to an elite college. This advice applies to anyone attending an elite college or university (eg. Michigan, Colby, WashU, Georgetown, MIT, Claremont McKenna, Amherst, Brown, ect.) next year.
First, a little bit about myself. I had a decent college experience that was amazing in many ways and less good in others. After graduation, I moved to DC and worked in politics for a couple years. This fall, I applied to law school, and I’ve been accepted to a number of good programs. I’m currently deciding among UChicago, Columbia, and NYU.
I'm also happy to answer questions as well, so feel free to ask away (after glancing through the questions I've already answered). Without further ado, here is the list!
  1. It doesn’t matter which elite college or university you go to.
A lot of people agonize over the fact that they didn’t get into Harvard and have to settle for Cornell, or that they didn’t get into MIT and have to go to Carnegie Mellon. Honestly, the truth is that where you go to school doesn’t matter so long as you go to an elite college or university. Today, the great news is that there are so many elite colleges and universities that provide the same quality education and similar professional and graduate school opportunities (see list of colleges and universities above).
For example, if one person goes to Colgate, another person goes to Harvard, and both people major in economics and apply to PhD programs in economics after they graduate, they’ll both have similar odds at getting into elite PhD programs assuming their GPAs, research experience, and faculty recommendations are similar. If the Colgate guy has better grades, better research experience, and better faculty recommendations, he’ll get accepted to a better economics PhD program than the Harvard guy.
The same is true for other grad schools (eg. law, medicine, business, ect.) and jobs (eg. Facebook, Goldman Sachs, McKinsey). So long as you go to an elite college or university, you’ll have largely the same opportunities as someone else who went to a slightly higher ranked elite college or university.
Additionally, people (who matter, such as employers and grad schools) largely view elite college grads from all elite schools as equally smart regardless of the elite school they attended. For example, when I meet someone from Princeton and someone from UVA, I’m not automatically more impressed with the Princeton guy, and I don’t automatically think the Princeton guy is smarter than the UVA guy. Instead, there’s more of an elite college/non-elite college dichotomy in my mind and in the minds of most elite college alumni and most employers. In other words, if I meet someone who went to WVU and someone who went to UVA, Princeton, Pomona, or Emory, I automatically DO think the non-elite college WVU guy is dumber than the elite college guy from any elite school (sorry, but it’s the truth!). However, I don’t really distinguish among the elite college guys based on the schools they attended. Instead, I distinguish them based on their intellect, personality, and professional success.
  1. All of the students at one highly ranked elite school aren’t necessarily smarter than all of the students at another slightly lower ranked elite school.
Yup, this is definitely true. Just because your high school classmate’s going to Harvard and you’re going to Cornell doesn’t mean that one year from now, two years from now, three years from now, or four years from now your high school classmate will be “smarter” than you. During college everyone grows intellectually and some grow more than others regardless of which school they attend. This means that you could graduate from Cornell with a 3.8 GPA while your high school buddy at Harvard might not adapt too well to college and might only pull a 3.4. Guess who’s “smarter” and has better professional and grad school opportunities when you graduate college? You, the Cornell guy! The same is true even if you attended Colby or UVA while your high school classmate went to Harvard.
  1. Higher ranked elite colleges aren’t necessarily more difficult academically than lower ranked elite colleges.
Yup, this one’s also true. Just because Harvard’s acceptance rate is twice as low as Amherst’s acceptance rate doesn’t make Harvard students twice as smart as Amherst students or Harvard classes twice as hard as Amherst classes. Honestly, the students at both schools are likely equally smart and the classes are probably about the same in terms of academic rigor.
That being said, there are some schools that are known for grade deflation, such as Columbia, UChicago, and Princeton. These schools are likely more academically rigorous than places like Dartmouth or Harvard, but their academic rigor stems less from their ranking and selectivity and more from their administrative policies and academic traditions that reinforce grade deflation.
  1. Even if you didn’t get admitted to an elite college or university, your life is not over.
Even if you didn’t do so well in high school grade-wise or got unlucky in college admissions, don’t panic. Your life is not over. You can still get into a top-notch grad school and/or get a top notch job and have phenomenal opportunities for the rest of your life.
I know many people who have done this. One of my professors at my Ivy league school who has a Wikipedia page (yup, he’s that famous in his field!) went to a bad California public college for undergrad and ended up getting a PhD from and a professorship at an Ivy League school. Similarly, one kid from my high school did really poorly academically in high school, got his s*** together at a tiny, no-name liberal arts college, and now attends Stanford Law School. Heck, I didn’t even get admitted to Stanford Law when I applied this fall while he did! It just comes to show that you can’t rest on your laurels if you do get into an Ivy League undergrad school, and you can’t be down on yourself if you don’t.
Suffice to say that if you’re dying to get that elite college or Ivy League degree, you’ll have plenty of opportunities to do so after undergrad. Most Ivies have great grad schools that you can attend later on in life. Or, to really spice things up, go abroad to Oxford, Cambridge, or LSE and get that one year British master degree immediately following college graduation! Tons of Americans do this.
  1. If you have multiple acceptances from elite colleges, pick the elite college where you feel you would fit in best.
Deposit day is right around the corner for most schools, and if you’re still agonizing over which elite college to choose, here’s a simple pro tip: pick the elite college where you’ll be happiest. For example, if you were admitted to Cornell and Georgetown and you believe that you would be happier at Georgetown compared to Cornell but are worried that “Georgetown isn’t an Ivy!”, go to Georgetown. Both schools are close enough in prestige that it doesn’t really matter which one you choose. Because you believe you’ll fit in better at Georgetown, you’ll be happier there, make more friends there, and get better grades there, which will create more future opportunities for you than you would have gotten had you chased the Ivy League label and gone to Cornell instead.
I say this from personal experience. While I enjoyed my college in many ways and would still recommend it to many potential students, I believe that I would have been happier at Williams or Amherst, and I would have gotten the same exact opportunities at both schools that I got at my school.
That being said, if you are admitted to a non-elite school (eg. OSU, UF, Ole Miss, ect.) and an elite school, if finances/student loans aren’t an issue, definitely choose the elite school over the non-elite school. I have nothing against non-elite schools, but the truth is that you will not get the same opportunities at these schools that you will at elite colleges. For this reason, if finances aren’t an issue, always pick the elite school.
  1. If you have multiple acceptances from elite colleges, pick the elite college that aligns best with your future goals.
If you’re still having trouble choosing which elite college to attend, consider which one will most align with your future goals. For example, if you were admitted to Dartmouth and Rice, and you are dead-set on living in Houston for the rest of your life, go to Rice. Why? Because a much larger proportion of your potential college friends from Rice will settle in Houston after college, and you’ll have a much larger network of friends in your city, which will make life more enjoyable and help you advance in whichever career you choose.
If you want to live abroad, make sure you choose a school that has a stronger international brand reputation. For example, if you’re choosing between Williams and Georgetown, and you’re 100% sure that you want to live abroad for a significant portion of your life, you should probably choose Georgetown (unless you absolutely hate it) because far more people abroad will know Georgetown than Williams.
In general, a plurality of graduates from each elite school tend to cluster in one or two cities. For Dartmouth and all the New England Ivies/Little Ivies, it’s Boston and NYC (and SF to a lesser extent). For Penn, it’s Philly and NYC (and SF to a lesser extent). For Princeton and Columbia, it’s NYC (and SF to a lesser extent). For UVA and Georgetown, it’s DC (and NYC to a lesser extent). For Berkeley and Stanford, it’s SF and LA (and NYC to a lesser extent). For Northwestern, UChicago, Notre Dame, and WashU, it’s Chicago (and NYC to a lesser extent). For Duke and Emory, it’s Atlanta (and DC/NYC to a lesser extent).
Does this mean that there are no elite college alums from your elite college in non-feeder cities? No! Of course there are alums in these cities, and these cities will likely have alumni clubs that you can join. However, chances are that the majority of your future friends at whichever elite school you attend will likely follow the crowd to the feeder city(ies) that most alums from your school go to after graduation. Definitely keep this in mind as you choose which college to attend.
Internationally, most larger American elite schools (eg. non liberal arts colleges) will have solid alumni networks and alumni clubs in London and Hong Kong. Other cities, such as Beijing, Shanghai, Singapore, Paris, Berlin, and Dubai may have alumni, but there might not be a large, active alumni club, so if you want to live in these locations, it’s definitely a good idea to choose a university with more name recognition internationally (eg. Berkeley over Amherst, unless you hate Berkeley) that will make you recognizable to people you may meet and befriend while living in one of these cities.
  1. Attending an elite college or university for undergrad does NOT guarantee that you’ll be admitted to an elite college or university for grad school.
Attending an elite school for undergrad does not give you a free pass in grad school admissions. Sure, it makes grad school admissions easier compared to the guy applying to grad school from University of Detroit or Frostburg State, but you still have to earn your spot in grad school, and you can’t just coast based on the prestige of your elite undergrad school.
For example, since all med schools are really selective (eg. <10% acceptance rate), most of my classmates from my Ivy in medical school attend places like Iowa, Rutgers, and Texas Tech. Did a couple get admitted to Harvard and Columbia? Sure, but only one or two. While these lesser ranked schools aren’t necessarily housed in prestigious universities, all of my classmates at these med schools are guaranteed to have stable, high-paying jobs for life, regardless of which one they attend. That is definitely an enviable position to be in, so they’re certainly doing very well for themselves.
For law school, graduating from an elite undergrad school definitely gives you a bit of a bump, but not a massive one. For example, if the median college GPA of admitted students at a law school that you’re applying to is a 3.9, then you’ll be competitive with a 3.8 or a 3.85 instead of a 3.9 by virtue of the fact that you went to an elite school. Suffice to say that it’s a bit of a bump, but not a massive one. However, by attending an elite school, you’ve likely gotten a lot of opportunities to polish the soft side of your application (eg. extracurriculars, recommendations, ect.) due to the sheer amount of resources available at elite schools. This soft part of your application will stand out more compared to applicants who didn’t attend elite schools. In general, I’d say more than three quarters of my classmates who applied to law school from my Ivy got accepted to T14 law schools. However, nearly one quarter didn’t, and several opted out of the application process altogether because they knew that they wouldn’t get into a T14 school.
Other grad programs elite college graduates regularly attend include business school, public policy/international affairs school, and PhDs. While attending elite colleges raises your chances slightly for admission to these elite grad schools, it does not guarantee that you’ll be admitted to Harvard Business School, Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School (public policy/international affairs), or Stanford’s PhD in Computer Science. Heck, attending an elite undergrad doesn’t 100% guarantee that you’ll get admitted to UT Austin’s MBA program or University of Washington’s Computer Science masters program.
This means that you can’t rest on your laurels. You still have to work hard and earn your spot at an elite grad school.
  1. If you’re burnt out from high school, take a gap year.
I really wish I had taken a gap year after high school. I went to a very competitive high school where lots of kids go to elite colleges and universities, and I was really burnt out when I showed up at college. While I did well academically my freshman year, I really believe that I would have benefitted from some time off.
For this reason, I’d highly recommend that you take a gap year if you’re burnt out. However, just because you’re taking a gap year doesn’t mean that you should be unproductive and do nothing. Instead, take some online courses, do a remote internship, or learn a foreign language. You won’t have many more opportunities in your life when you have several months without any commitments, so take advantage of that time to be with family and learn a new skill or hobby.
  1. If you want to learn a new foreign language, start taking classes in that foreign language the moment you arrive at your elite college.
If you always had a burning desire to learn Russian, Mandarin, Italian, Japanese, or any other language for that matter, but your high school didn’t offer classes in that language, guess what? Your elite college likely does and now is by far the best and easiest time in your life to learn that language. You will never again in your life have four years when you can consistently and easily devote yourself to learning a new foreign language. If you start a new language during your first semester freshman year and take a course in that language every single semester during your entire time in college (including a semester abroad with language immersion), I guarantee that you’ll reach at least intermediate proficiency in that foreign language by the time you graduate, even if that language is Russian or Mandarin.
  1. Elite colleges and universities only provide you with a limited set of (really good) careers options.
Oh boy, this is definitely a piece of information I wish I knew before attending my school. This information might be a bit of a downer for some, but attending an elite college or university will not open doors to every single career you’ve dreamed of. In general, elite universities feed people into five or six different careers through their career and grad school advising offices.
First, they’ll provide you opportunities to work on Wall Street (or other financial centers, such as Houston, San Francisco, Chicago, and Atlanta, depending on where your school is located) in investment banking. Investment bankers, or IBankers for short, usually work for large banks that were bailed out during the Great Recession, such as JP Morgan, Bank of America, and Goldman Sachs. IBankers help companies sell stock and bonds and revalue themselves after merging with other companies or selling off portions of their own company. That one sentence explanation is a vast oversimplification of IBanking, so keep that in mind. On a daily basis, IBankers create excel spreadsheets and powerpoint slides. They work crazy hours (eg. 60-70 hours per week, plus work on the weekends), but they also get paid a lot of money right out of college (eg. $100,000+ first year). If this appeals to you, check out Wall Street Oasis (WSO), which has by far the most resources and information for those who want to work on Wall Street. If this doesn’t sound appealing to you, there are a few other options to consider.
Elite universities also provide their students and graduates with jobs in management consulting. Management consultants work in teams of five to ten people and advise senior management (eg. CEOs, executive VPs, COOs, MDs, ect.) at large companies on the strategy and operations of their companies. Each week, consultants fly out to their client from the city they (the consultants) live in (eg. NYC, Boston, San Francisco, ect.). Usually, the client is located in pretty uneventful places like Spartanburg, South Carolina, so don’t get your hopes up about jetting over to Dubai or Miami and sipping martinis for the week. That’s not going to happen. Like IBankers, management consultants are glorified excel and powerpoint monkeys. Their hours are better than IBankers, and they usually do not have much weekend work. In order to land a consulting gig at a top firm (eg. McKinsey, Bain, and BCG, which are the Harvard, Yale, and Princeton of consulting), you’ll need to earn at least a 3.8 GPA or you’ll need to major in a hard STEM subject and pull above a 3.5 GPA. Otherwise, they probably won’t interview you even though you go to Williams, Harvard, or some other elite school. Still, you could land a consulting offer with a lower GPA at a less prestigious firm or a boutique firm, and you’ll have a pretty similar experience. In other words, your elite college will provide you opportunities in management consulting so long as your college GPA isn’t terrible. If you want to learn more about management consulting, check out Management Consulted and WSO’s forum on management consulting.
Elite schools also open up doors in the tech world. If you’re a whiz at computer science, you’ll have a strong shot at landing a software engineering job at Google, Facebook, Amazon, or another large tech company, provided that you can pass the coding interview. If you aren’t good enough to pass the coding interview at these places, rest assured as there are still plenty of other software job opportunities to choose from at less well known companies and startups, so you’ll graduate with a job making at least $70,000 and probably upwards of $100,000 if you play your cards right. Prestigious tech companies (eg. Apple) also have non-software jobs that your career services office at your elite school may enable you to recruit for. These positions are notoriously difficult to land because the barriers to entry are low (you don’t need technical skills), but you’ll at least have a better shot than most people at them because you attend an elite school.
Elite schools also help you win fellowships, such as Fulbrights and Teach for America. Your elite school likely has a fellowship office or a person in your career services office devoted to fellowships who can advise you. This advisor is typically not available at less prestigious institutions.
Elite schools also funnel students into professional graduate schools, especially law school and medical school. I’m not going to discuss either of these options here because I’ve already discussed both at length in another question above.
On the other hand, here is what elite schools do NOT provide career-wise. Elite schools do NOT provide special opportunities in politics on Capitol Hill or at the UN. They do NOT have a bunch of job postings in journalism at the NY Times or the Washington Post. They do NOT open tons of doors in entertainment and Hollywood. They do NOT offer tons of professional opportunities for musicians and artists. Sorry to burst your bubble, but attending Harvard or any other elite school isn’t going to get you a job at the UN, NY Times, Hollywood, or the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Career services won’t do jack for you if those are your career goals (except maybe help you land an unpaid internship). Instead, you’ll have to hustle on your own and network a ton to land those opportunities. It’s better for you to receive this tough love now than later on, even if it’s a bit of a downer to hear this.
Instead, maybe you always dreamed of being an English or History professor? Sorry to break it to you, but even if you’re talented enough to be a humanities professor (which you probably are) and even if you get into Harvard for your humanities PhD, the job market is so bad for humanities professors that you probably won’t get a job as a professor no matter how hard you try. The job market is marginally better for aspiring hard science and social science professors, but it’s still tough. If you really want to be a professor, go get a PhD in business after undergrad. While you probably won’t land a professorship at Harvard, there are tons of business professorships available at other schools, and you’ll almost certainly land one if you work hard. Again, sorry for the downer, but it’s better to be blunt and brutally honest than to lie to you and not tell you the truth.
  1. Be social and join extracurriculars once you arrive at your elite college or university, but don’t overextend yourself.
If you were shy and just studied a lot in high school, make sure you break out of your shell and be social once you arrive by joining and participating in a couple (more than one, but not 50+) extracurriculars and clubs on a very regular basis. If you feel social anxiety because you’re in a brand new place where half the kids were valedictorians or salutatorians at their high schools, don’t sweat it because your classmates are all feeling the same anxiety you’re feeling. My best advice to you is fake it ‘til you make it. Make sure to stand up straight, look your fellow classmates in the eyes, and smile. If you do those three things, you’ll be fine.
  1. Be aware of social hierarchies on campus and within your extracurriculars and clubs, but don’t be a social climber who spends their entire college life climbing these social hierarchies to the exclusion of everything else.
Once you arrive on campus, make sure you acquaint yourself with social hierarchies on campus and within your extracurriculars and clubs. For example, which clubs tend to be more popular? Which clubs are less mainstream (and frowned upon)? Ask yourself how people will perceive you if you join one club or another. Do some clubs feed into other clubs (eg. all members of the football team join one specific fraternity)? Who are the most influential people in the clubs you joined? How about the least influential?
At the same time, don’t be a shallow social climber who only cares about social status. People who only social climb end up miserable because they don’t form genuine friendships based on shared interests and values. Plus, social climbers don’t realize that at the end of four years once everyone graduates, the social hierarchy that existed on campus no longer matters at all as an alumnus or alumna of your elite college. Literally no one cares what sports team or fraternity or sorority you were in after you graduate. It sounds so “third grade” to talk about those things as alumni.
Nevertheless, make sure that you do not find yourself at the bottom of the social hierarchy while you’re in school (except initially WITHIN your extracurricular clubs where you’ll de facto have to start at the bottom as a new student and member in the club). You will definitely pay a big price socially while you’re in school if you’re at the bottom socially, and you will definitely be less happy. The good news is that it’s very easy to not be at the bottom. Just have your social antenna up, be socially aware, and don’t join unpopular clubs that have a strong social stigma on campus.
  1. Be strategic about the classes you take and the professors you choose.
In order to earn a high GPA, make sure you choose your classes and professors carefully. Some classes and professors are notorious for their harsh grading while others are much easier, and you should do everything you can to avoid the harder classes and professors. If you want to figure out which classes and professors are difficult, just ask an upperclassman majoring in a particular subject which ones they would avoid in their specific major.
Also, I’d highly recommend asking upperclassmen which classes and professors are the best. During fall semester, make it a point to ask five different upperclassmen which classes/professors were their favorite. Keep a list of these classes and professors and consider taking them if they align with your interests or distribution requirements.
  1. Take classes in your strongest subject areas during your first semester of freshman year.
Attending an elite college is a big bump up in terms of academic rigor compared to high school. If you take humanities and social science classes, you will have more reading than you’ve ever had before in an academic environment, and if you take science and math classes, you will have harder problem sets and exams than you’ve ever experienced in high school. As a first year student, you will likely be in class with some upperclassmen who have one, two, and three years of elite college academic experience under their belts. This means that they will likely be more skilled academically than the average freshman, and it will be harder, but certainly not impossible, for first year students like you to perform as well as they, especially in subject areas you know little about.
For this reason, I would highly recommend that you take classes in subject areas that you are really strong in during the first semester of your first year. If you were a US History buff in high school, then take an American history class. If you crushed it in AP French last year, then take French. If you’ve read tons of American literature, then take an American literature class. If you love stats, take a stats class.
  1. Don’t be a “know it all” or a “try hard” in class.
Don’t be the “know it all” who always raises their hand to answer every question in class. Don’t be the “try hard” who tries to demonstrate that they're smarter than everyone else. People who behave this way are off-putting and have toxic personal brands and bad reputations on all elite college campuses. Don’t be one of those guys.
On the other hand, do make an insightful comment (or two, or three, depending on the class) every class if you’re in a discussion-oriented class (then shut up). Do go to office hours and forge strong relationships with your professors. Do participate in study groups with other students. Do write good essays and perform well on midterms and final exams. Do your best academically and earn good grades.
  1. Invest time in dating.
Your four years at an elite college will be by far the easiest time to date during your entire life. You will be surrounded by hundreds to thousands of other smart, horny kids who are away from home for the first time and are keen to try new things. If you’re showing up to college as a virgin, guess what? So is the majority of your class, so you’re in good company, and there’s nothing to be embarrassed about.
If you’re confused or unclear about how to date, here are a couple simple tips that may be helpful whether you’re a guy or a girl. If you fancy someone in one of your classes or clubs, make sure you build a little rapport with them by engaging in small talk a couple times so they know who you are (which you’ve probably/hopefully done before/after class or during club activities). Remember to stand up straight, smile (not in a cheesy, contrived way), and look them in the eyes when you talk to them (and everyone else for that matter). Then, ask them casually to grab lunch (or coffee if students at your elite college grab coffee regularly) by saying something like, “Hey, let’s grab lunch some time!” Remember, in romance, especially if you’re a guy, never “ask” to do something; instead, suggest doing something by saying “Let’s do this” or “Let’s do that.”
If they say no, they’re probably not interested in you romantically even if they think you’re a good person, so don’t take it personally and instead move on to another person. Luckily, there are hundreds to thousands of other people that you can date at your elite school, so don’t worry. However, don’t ask out several people in one club or one class during the span of a week or two. You’ll come across as creepy if you do this.
If they say yes to lunch or coffee, you’ll probably exchange phone numbers with them and set up a time for lunch/coffee. You might even go to lunch together right then and there. After you grab lunch/coffee with them once or twice, study buddy with them if they’re in your class or collaborate together on a project for your club. Be somewhat subtle about your intentions at this point, but don’t be subtle for too long, which could put you in the friendzone.
Then, if things are going smoothly, and you sense that they’re also interested in you romantically (eg. they sit really closely to you, text you all the time about non-school related stuff, talk about sex/romance with you, hug you, and/or physically touch you in sexual or non-sexual places) study buddy or work together with them in a common area of your dorm once and/or invite them to a party. Then, if that goes well, invite them to work together in your room or bring them back to your room, and the two of you will probably end up making out and/or hooking up. Always make sure you have consent during this last step. From there, you can convert this encounter into a relationship and have a boyfriend or girlfriend if you would like.
Investing time in dating now while you’re at an elite college when it’s easy and accessible will make you more effective at dating later in life after college when you interact with many fewer people and dating is not as easy.
  1. Elite colleges don’t teach you how to network, but learning how to network is incredibly important.
Networking is an incredibly important skill that you won’t learn in your classes at an elite college. In order to excel personally, professionally, and socially as a student and graduate of an elite college, it’s essential that you take the time to learn how to network efficiently and effectively.
If you’re unsure where to start, here are a few simple tips that will help you become an effective networker. First, before you contact anyone, make a list of a few (two to four, not 10+) professional fields that you would like to work in. These might be finance, law, medicine, politics, or tech to name a few. Then, make a list of everyone you and your family know who either (a) lives in the city or location where you want to work and has a solid professional career in any field or (b) works in the field(s) you want to work in but lives in any location.
Once you have this list, contact all of these people (usually by email), tell them that you’re looking for career advice and ask them if they’d be willing to speak with you over the phone to give you advice. These phone calls are informally known as “informational interviews.” In most cases, assuming they know your family and you well, they will say yes to the phone call. However, if they don’t respond, send them a polite follow up email a week after you sent your first email, and if they don’t respond again, then don’t sweat it, move on, and speak to your other contacts on the phone.
Along with reaching out to people your family and you already know, you can also send “cold emails” to people you do not know who work in your desired fields. Before “cold emailing” random people, you should first reach out to graduates of your high school, graduates of your elite college, graduates of your elite college’s grad schools, and graduates of other colleges who were in your fraternity or sorority at other schools. Your elite college will have an alumni database that you can access; talk to advisors at your school’s career services office about acquiring this access. LinkedIn is also another great resource for tracking down alumni. Once you’ve exhausted these sources, you can “cold email” or “cold call” anyone in your desired field regardless of the school they attended. Since you may not have any connections to people you “cold email” or “cold call,” you may end up having a very low success rate in acquiring new contacts for your professional network using this method (eg. one out of ten “cold calls” may result in an actual connection). Nevertheless, with sufficient volume, “cold emailing” and “cold calling” can be very effective techniques for networking and are well worth the investment under the right circumstances.
Once you’re on the phone for an informational interview, start by asking your contact about their career (or instead about working in city X if they work in a different career field than your desired field but live in the city that you're targeting). After they’ve spoken for a bit about their career (or city), tell them that you’re interested in careers (and/or internships) in their field (or careers in field Y in their city) and ask them for advice. If they work in one of these fields, you may want to only say that you’re interested in careers in their field and avoid mentioning the other fields altogether, even if you’re also interested in those fields as well. Additionally, they will likely have lots of advice to give you. If they don’t work in one of your desired fields, they probably won’t have as much advice to give you.
Either way, ask them if they know anyone that works in your desired field(s) and your desired work location(s) and ask them if they would be willing to introduce you to these people. If they say yes (which they hopefully will), they’ll put you in touch with one or more of their contacts (usually via email) in your desired field(s) and location(s). Set up phone calls with their contacts, talk to them on the phone, ask for more contacts (especially if they don’t offer you an internship or a job), and repeat this process until you land a position. Send thank you emails to each person after every phone call and connect with each person you speak with on the phone on LinkedIn.
After each semester or every few months, send an email update to all of your contacts detailing anything new, RELEVANT, and/or interesting in your academic, extracurricular, and professional life (eg. classes you took, clubs you recently joined, internships you landed, awards you won, trips you took, ect.). When you send this email update to your contacts, do NOT add all of your contacts to one email message and send out one email message to everyone. Instead, send separate email messages to each contact and copy and paste the same text into each separate email message. While you’re networking, you may realize that some (or many) contacts you’ve made are not worth investing much time in, so you may choose to stop sending them email updates on a regular basis.
That’s networking in a nutshell. If you follow these steps starting freshman year, you’ll be way ahead of the pack compared to your peers.
  1. Get an internship during your freshman summer.
A surprisingly large number of students at elite colleges waste their freshman summers doing nothing because they don’t invest time in procuring a freshman summer internship. While finding a freshman summer internship can be difficult given that many large companies and organizations don’t typically hire freshmen for the summer, landing a freshman summer internship is certainly not impossible, especially since you attend an elite college, which will make hiring managers more likely to give you an offer.
Most freshman summer internships are unpaid. This means that you need to either (a) find an internship near your parents’ or relatives’ homes where you’ll get free housing and meals or (b) procure funding from family or other sources to cover the cost of living while you do your freshman summer internship in another city, such as NYC, DC, or SF. Elite colleges usually give grants to students doing unpaid public service internships, so you may be able to apply for funding from your school. Ask your career services office about funding options available at your school.
If you can't acquire funding for a freshman summer internship and/or you would prefer to live with family and relatives during your freshman summer, then you’ll probably have to network with alumni of your elite college that live in your local area, family friends, your high school teachers, and anyone else you know that lives in your local area to land a freshman summer internship. Use the networking strategies listed above, and you should be able to find something.
There are several local internship options near your home that are feasible to get for each career field. For politics, you can volunteer for a congressional campaign or work in the district office of your local Congressman. For law, you can reach out to local law firms and see if they’ll let you do some legal work during the summer. For tech, you can work for startups in your local area or remotely. For finance, you can contact wealth managers in your area and ask if they’ll let you intern during the summer. For medicine, you can contact doctor’s offices or hospitals and ask to shadow a doctor or nurse for a few weeks. Suffice to say there are lots of internship options for freshman summer, and it’s up to you to seize them.
  1. Find mentors.
While you're at your elite college, make sure you forge relationships with mentors. These mentors can include upperclassmen, professors, and alumni. Mentors will be able to advise you on all aspects of your life and will enable you to maximize your academic, personal, social, and professional success. By using the networking tips described above, you will develop strong relationships with a set of mentors who will be pivotal for your success
  1. Have fun!
Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, have fun! College is an amazing time wherever you end up going, so make sure as a student that you periodically put the books away and go to a frat party, floor party, and/or other social event(s). Never again in your life will it be deemed “okay” and “normal” to stay up into the wee hours of the morning drinking (or not drinking) and partying on a weekly basis. Take advantage of this time and have fun! Don’t get in trouble or break the law, but do make sure you do some memorable things so that you’ll have stories to tell and reminisce about when you hang out with your college buddies after you graduate.
Wherever you go to school, you’re going to have an awesome time. I sincerely mean that. Best of luck next year and as they say in theater, break a leg!
submitted by elitecollegethroaway to ApplyingToCollege [link] [comments]


2020.04.23 01:26 SolHiemis The Magician's Handbook - Part 24

"How do you want to do it?" she said. "You're the mentor, I'm the protege, remember?"
"Yeah, yeah, sure," I quipped. "Do you have a passport?"
"I think so," she said. "I went on holiday with the family a couple years back. It should still be valid, but I'm not sure right now."
"Better find out," I said. "How are you with money?"
"Tight," she said.
"Fuck."
"What's wrong?"
"I thought we might want to rent a car, there's dozens of renters that will let you cross the border. Sprung up when there were no trains for months. Fucking vultures," I grumbled.
"Yeah, I don't think that's happening," she said. "Sorry, I didn't budget for a random trip to Scotland."
"Alright, trains it is," I said, scribbling in the notebook. "We'll figure something out, but I'm probably going to have to go see the family before we get going. They'd go ballistic if I went to Scotland and didn't spend any time with them."
"I mean, doing whatever it is we're doing sounds more important, doesn't it?"
"It does," I admitted, "but they don't know that."
"Alright, so how are we doing this? How long do you need to be with them?" she said.
I squinted as I thought about my family and how they would react. "A day or two, at least. They'll want to have a beer or five with their daughter."
"That's... reasonable," she said.
"What about you? What will you do while I give them my time?"
"I mean, I'll just go back down to England," she said.
"Ah," I said, raising my finger. "I was thinking I'd go see the family first."
"Uh, why?"
"We don't know what's waiting for us," I said. "We might be held there for weeks, or even months."
"Months?" she said, opening her eyes wide. "Hang on, I can't be out there for months. I've got things to do! I've got a job here."
"Oh, like there isn't always the next part-time job," I said.
"I mean, not really, no," she said. "I'd quite like to keep this one."
"It's a decision you'll have to make," I said. "I'm sorry."
"What are you going to tell Jess?" she said.
"I don't know," I said. "Don't change the topic."
She sighed. "I could just stay here while you visit your family, and meet you in... Edinburgh?"
I grimaced. "I'd rather we didn't split up, if I'm honest. Too many bad things can happen, and they get two chances if we travel by ourselves."
"Right, right, yeah," she said. "Of course. I can't pay for a hostel in Glasgow, though. Or anywhere. That's expensive."
"Yeah, you're right." I groaned. "Fucking hell, why couldn't the library be in Glasgow? Life would be so much simpler."
"I don't know," Vicky said. "You're the one who knows Scottish history, why did they put it in Edinburgh?"
"Not now." I put my head in my hands, trying to figure out how to move Victoria around. I tried to remember the full layout of our house and whether there was a bed to spare anywhere in it. If there was, there was an option. If there wasn't, we were still at square one anyway.
"You could stay with family," I said quietly. "I think they'd take you in."
"You think so?" she said, raising an eyebrow.
"Maybe," I said. "I'm not sure. But if hostels in Glasgow aren't an option, then you're either travelling alone, or you're sleeping at ours."
"What happened to not wanting to separate?" she said, and I rolled my eyes.
"End of the day, it's a numbers game," I said. "And if I have to get you to Edinburgh, I'll get you to Edinburgh one way or another."
She smiled. "I guess I am your protege after all."
"Yeah, you are. Don't let it get to your head."
"Of course," she said.
"Okay, that part's figured out. What happens when we get to Edinburgh? Do we know where the library is?"
"No, there's no map in the Handbook," she said. "I went and checked after Christensen's little quip."
"Yeah, that makes sense. I'd do the same. You're learning," I said, trying to stay focused and contain my smile.
"Anyway, no idea where it might be," she said, looking back down at the notes I'd scribbled down in my illegible handwriting.
I sighed. "Fucking hell. The fucking bastards have no idea how to document what they're doing. It's just... give me a moment."
I closed my eyes and raised a shield around our table and us. When I couldn't hear a single sound from the outside anymore, I screamed as loud as I could until I felt the shield buck. I shut up and let it fade, returning the outside noise to our ears. "There we go. Thanks."
"You're welcome," she said. "Anyway, since we have no idea, I guess we'll just have to figure it out when we get there."
I sighed. "Yeah, you're right. Cross that bridge when we get to it, and all of that."
"Exactly," she said. "Is that okay with you? You still look wound up."
"I'm going crazy," I said softly. "But I'll be okay. I always am. Anyway, I think that's it."
"Is it?" she said, tilting her head.
"Yeah. I mean, we know how to get there, and we know what to do when we get there. Sounds like that's it to me," I said, leaning back.
"I mean, if you say so. You're the mentor," she quipped. "Anyway, I think we had enough small talk last night."
"We did, yeah," I said. "You want to just pay for this and go for a very quiet walk?"
"Sounds about right," she said.
When I gave her the cash, she went to the bar to pay for our coffee and let me out into the street. It still wasn't raining, even though I was certain it would very soon, and the air was thick and unforgiving. Nothing I could do relieved that, and we soon agreed to go our own ways. There were better times to go for walks.
The skies opened just as I reached my front door, and I found Jess in the kitchen having a cup of coffee. Her her was completely messy, and she had headphones in her ears, which explained why she hadn't heard me come in.
"Hey," I said as I placed my hands on her shoulders.
She yelped, but when she realised it was me, she took the headphones out and got up to kiss me. "Hey, beautiful," she said.
"Hey," I said again, in the softest tone I could imagine. We shared the moment for longer than I expected, but that was okay. I remembered the night we'd had, the conversation we'd shared. Everything was okay.
"How was your coffee?" she said when she finally pulled away. "Did you talk about the personal things?"
"Yeah," I said, before I remembered that she didn't know that Vicky was joining me in Scotland. "Well, no. Not really."
She tilted her head. "What do you mean? Did you talk about her ex?"
"No," I said. "No, we didn't. As soon as I brought it up, she shut me down like it was the most taboo thing in the world."
"So what did you two talk about that I couldn't hear, then?"
"Things," I said.
"What things?"
"Just... things. Other things in her life. Things she was comfortable sharing."
"Right," she said. "Anyway, I'm glad you got back before I left."
That caught me by surprise. I'd completely forgotten we weren't living together permanently. "You're leaving?"
"Yeah," she said, "I've got to get back to my own place. I love it here, but I've got a better working atmosphere there, you understand? Don't worry, we'll see each other soon."
"Just as I got used to you," I quipped. "It's a shame."
"Honestly, don't worry," she said. "I'm not breaking up with you. How could I, anyway? You're the only one that's ever made my heart stop skipping beats."
When I parsed what she'd said, I couldn't do anything other than kiss her, and kiss her again, trying to forget that I was hiding a whole other life from her. I tried to forget that I didn't know for how long I wouldn't see her, and that I still had a secret to reveal.
As we kissed, my phone vibrated in my pocket. I wasn't expecting any email other than exam results. Exam results. When the realisation hit me, I started crumbling and shaking.
"You okay?" she said, pulling away from me.
"No," I said, sitting down across her. "I need to check something."
I pulled my phone out, and the words stared back at me. Nanomaterials exam results, Catherine Robertson. "Exam results," I gulped. What if I'd failed? What if I really was consigned to another year at uni on top of everything I had to do already. I started shaking again, the fear spreading through me like cancer. "I can't open it."
She stood in front of me, holding my face. "You can. We can."
Taking a deep, trembling breath, I unlocked the phone and opened the site where the results were. After a loading time that seemed like an eternity, my personal page opened, revealing my grade, a bare pass.
"I passed," I whimpered. "I passed."
"That's great!" she exclaimed. "I'm proud of you."
"Yeah," I said, blanking out. "Thanks."
I had passed my last exam. After so much struggle, after so many failures and obstacles, I had finally come within one hurdle of the ultimate goal. I was so close. I would never have to take another exam again. However, I felt myself struggling to be happy about it.
I remembered the anxiety of the night before. I remembered the gut-wrenching feeling of failure. I remembered every single all-nighter I'd ever pulled to study for exams, and I broke down. I couldn't scream in triumph, I couldn't cry in defeat. All I could do was sit there and tremble, letting the wave of emotion sink me.
Jess didn't say a word as I trembled and sobbed there. She placed my head on her chest and caressed it as I sobbed, whispering words of comfort to little effect. It was over. It was finally over. I was finally rid of the fucking thing. Just the thesis to go, and I could bullshit my way through that.
When I'd sobbed enough to calm down, I looked up at her with my teary eyes and my stupid red face. "You need that gap year," she quipped.
I burst into laughter as my tears dried on my face and got up to tower over her again. "Thank you," I whispered repeatedly, wishing I could find better words. She'd done so little, and yet so much.
"You're welcome," she said, and kissed me.
After another detour to my bed, Jess packed up and left, leaving me without words to thank her for what she'd done to me. The flat suddenly felt quiet and empty, but I felt alive again. Three obligations to juggle had gone down to two, and my thinking brain was back in business, churning away at what had to be done to get my arse up to Edinburgh.
I researched the procedures over gap years and residence permits deep into the night, trying to figure out what I'd have to manage if it were to turn out that we'd be in Scotland for longer than anticipated. While my residence permit was valid for another few years, the uni website was suspiciously vague about gap years.
They kept going on tangents about tuition fees and transferable credit, where I only needed one thing. Students with only their thesis left often took gap years, so it can't have been so uncommon to be impossible. However, the uni website didn't say anything about it. As my eyes started closing, I decided to leave it for tomorrow and ask them in person.
As I laid in bed, I dreamed of the Munros of Scotland. I dreamed of hiking up to the top of one after the other, and whenever I reached the top, there would be something left for me. Be it a regular piece of paper, the shapes of the clouds or words carved into stone, they were there, and they were there for me to read.
The messages weren't clear, and as I climbed more and more of them, I started writing them down, but I couldn't piece anything sensible together. A thought passed my mind that I would probably have to climb every single one to piece everything together, but I could start finding patterns. A single sequence of words that appeared multiple times:
The one to be chosen.
When I connected the pattern, my thoughts started swirling, and so did the world around them. I woke up in my bed, sweaty, hot and alone. Jess wasn't there to calm me back to sleep. All I had was the beginning of the day, and more obligations.
All the enthusiasm from the day before had vanished. I dragged my feet around breakfast, trying to piece together what I had to do into a single stream of thought, but the dream kept returning to the fore. I kept thinking about the messages left, and whether they were real.
I was going to Scotland anyway. I might as well climb one of the Munros and see for myself. After I'd gone through my morning routine, I returned to my desk to find the Handbook opened to the page on self-propulsion.
That was strange. I didn't remember opening it to that page, or any other page the day before. All I could barely remember was what lay ahead --- the visit to my parents', and filing for a gap year. I wondered whether the Handbook might have influenced my dreams. The way it was seemingly influencing everything else in my brain, I wouldn't have even been surprised.
When I closed it and stuffed it into my backpack, I looked back at my desk and turned my computer on to research gap years at my university. As I looked through the page, I realised the words looked familiar, and only then remembered that the page had been in my browser history.
"You dumb bitch," I mumbled to myself as I recollected the evening before. "This is why you shouldn't go all night."
As I walked to the campus, I ran on complete autopilot, not even thinking for a second that I shouldn't be going for that walk. Only when I started nearing the campus did I realise that I had passed all my exams, and that they wouldn't be expecting me there.
When I found the student services' office, I queued up and waited. I could feel the Handbook in my backpack, I could feel the library calling me, pulling me in to go down and dive deep into magic. I remembered the missing books, and the shelves that were supposed to be chock-full. I remembered Christensen's distraught face again, and I realised that it was bad.
"Hello?" someone said. I heard fingers snapping, and I snapped out of my stream of consciousness to see one of the assistants waving at me.
"I'm sorry," I said, approaching them.
"Make it quick," he said. "Robertson, is it not?"
"Yes," I said. "I was wondering if I was eligible for a gap year."
"A gap year? After being so close to the end?" he remarked.
"Yes. For personal reasons. What I could read on the website indicated that eligibility for a gap year is automatic."
"It is, I'm just wondering about the motivation," he said, and I thought about how much I wanted him to shut up.
"I'd prefer not to say," I said sharply, and that shut him up as he put on a disgruntled expression and looked at his screen.
"Come back in an hour," he said. "Your case is certainly peculiar, but we'll take a look at it."
Peculiar? What was peculiar about a fourth-year deciding to take a gap year until the end? "Understood," I said. "Return here in one hour, then?"
"Yes, I thought I'd made as much clear," he said.
Taking a deep breath, I nodded. "Understood." I turned away and returned to the lobby.
My mind quickly started wandering. I started thinking about the library. I wondered whether the missing the books were the ones that I needed. As I wandered through the library in my head, I suddenly realised I didn't need to daydream. I had the real thing at my disposal.
I quickly walked through the corridors and triggered the elevator. When I'd passed the magnet-locked door, I shined on the walls, and the right-hand tunnel that stood there, empty, gaping.
"Empty?" I mumbled to myself. Instead of absent-mindedly turning left like I always did, curiosity got the better of me. Maybe for the first time ever, I'd come here to explore, rather than to study, and my attention kept being drawn to the other tunnel.
As I took my first steps to the right, away from the reading hall, I shined light over the entire width of the tunnel. For a tunnel that was in complete disuse, it was clean. Too clean, in fact. Something had to have built up on the walls, but there was nothing, Just the glossy black walls everywhere.
It didn't take long to find the end of the tunnel. When I turned around, I could still see the tinge of orange light coming from the reading room, before I turned back to the three black walls around me. There was no draft, no break in the texture of any of the walls, nothing. They were there, clean, black and monolithic, just like every wall that wasn't in the reading hall.
I looked back towards the other tunnel and realised what was missing. Something that every ray of sunlight in a normal room revealed. The Brownian motion of dust.
I walked back to the reading hall and wandered through it, looking at the shelves where the books I needed once stood. I recognised the titles around them, because I'd used them before, but the one book that I needed was gone. However, in its place, there was no dust.
That can't have been right. Even in the best-case scenario, people who used this library would shed skin and leave something behind. We weren't being decontaminated as we entered. There had to be some dust in the air, but nothing collected anywhere.
I got lost in my thoughts again, and my timer soon rang, reminding me I had to go enquire about my gap year again. I left the library to its peace, walking my way out with newfound suspicion of the tunnels' cleanliness. When the elevator reached the ground floor, the doors opened to reveal professor Christensen.
"Still here, are you?" he quipped.
"Things had to be done," I said.
"I hope they're done now," he said and entered the elevator. "You should've been in Edinburgh already."
"If I want to stay undercover, professor, I won't be there until Monday. I'm very sorry."
"Is that so?" he said. "Shame. I hope it doesn't come back to bite us."
"Me too," I said, and the doors opened for the second floor. To my great surprise, my gap year was approved for no extra tuition. I'd only be subject to a loss of student benefits for the next twelve months. Brilliant, another obstacle taken down.
Feeling the weight on my shoulders decrease moment after moment, I called my father.
"Catherine! It's been a while since we've heard from you!" he exclaimed as he picked the phone up.
"It's been stressful, da," I said, smiling and breathing the filthy air around me. "Just had a gap year approved."
"Gap year? How come?"
"I can't do it," I said. "I'm broken, done, exhausted."
"Aye, I can understand that," he said. "Shouldn't bee too difficult if you've got your finances sorted. Are you coming back home, then?"
"I am, actually," I said.
"That's brilliant!" he said. "You know how much we m-"
"But only for the weekend," I interrupted.
"Ah," he said, suddenly turning quiet. "That's a shame."
"No, don't get me wrong, I plan to move back to Scotland eventually," I said. "But a friend and I are going hiking, that's why I was only planning to stay at yours over the weekend."
"I see," he said. "Is she your girlfriend that you've been talking about?"
"No, sadly not. Jess's got to stay in England, nothing we can do about that."
"Well, I hope you and your friend enjoy the hike."
"I plan to, yeah," I said. "Listen, can she stay over at ours too? So she doesn't have to go paying for a hostel in Glasgow."
"I'm sorry. We don't have a bed to spare," he said. "Does she have a bag?"
"We were planning to rent our gear, if I'm honest," I said, trying to keep the facade up. "Easier to travel that way."
"Aye, you have a point there," he said. Success. "No luck, then."
"We'll figure something out," I said. Just a bump on the road. Edinburgh, and more magic, were now tantalisingly close, and I wasn't going to let our plan fall through.
"Alright," he said. "Thanks for letting us know, though. You'll be coming soon, I hope?"
"Tomorrow evening, yes," I said. "Catch an off-peak train, you know, and then it's five hours to Glasgow."
"Let us know, then," he said. "I'll see you soon."
"See you," I said, and hung up. I had lied about many things there, but my excitement to see my family wasn't one of them. They were, after all, still family.
After I'd informed Vicky of the bad news and agreed to meet her in Edinburgh on Monday morning, I went home to buy a ticket and pack. I bagged everything I could think of, from reading material, to the largest power bank I could find, lots of simple clothes, and the Handbook.
Jess had asked for one last sleepover before I left for Scotland, so I took one last longing look at my flat before I left it for who-knows-how long. I wondered whether I'd ever come back, and what the place would look like once I did.
I packed another backpack with all the perishables I had, turned the power off, and decided to splurge on a taxi because I wasn't walking halfway across town with two backpacks like the last idiot around.
We struggled to fall asleep, feeling the weight of the moment. We hadn't been apart for more than a week all summer, and over the past few weeks we'd grown into each other too much for comfort. After many tears and kisses, we finally fell asleep.
The next morning, after she'd blessed me with breakfast, she led me to the train station and kissed me, in broad daylight and in full view of the general public, until the train started moving. I looked back at her until she disappeared, and I could only look ahead. Towards Scotland. Towards home.
A/N: So here I am at the end of a chonky chapter! Did you guys thing this one was too long, and that I might've cut it? I felt like I wanted to go long and just drag the story back into its trough, but you guys might disagree. Other feedback also welcome :)
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  8. SFE Top Topics; Your Student Finance Application
  9. Student Finance Application Journey 2019/20 - YouTube

2020 How to Apply for Student Finance England UK (DON'T Get SCREWED by SFE) - Duration: 8:26. Boyuan Zhao 19,969 views. 8:26. MY EXPERIENCE WITH STUDENT FINANCE ENGLAND - Duration: 14:59. I will explain the ins and outs of Student Finance England (SFE). This video is dedicated to UK Students who are applying for student finance this year. Watc... *If you're a student you should watch this. So my journey with SFE, has been a LONG and tedious one, so i thought i'd talk about it, incase you might be in s... Student Finance England deal with all of the student funding for England. They are so busy and receive 1000s of documents daily. I share important informatio... Find out what happens after a student applies for student finance from Student Finance England. #Studentfinance #Tuitionfees #HowdoIgetpaid #Applyingforstude... Find out about the types of evidence you might be asked for when you apply for student finance. #Studentfinance #studentfinanceevidence #applyingforstudentfi... Student Finance England is a service provided by the Student Loans Company. We provide financial support on behalf of the government to students from England... Find out what information you need to send us when you apply for student finance. ... 2020 How to Apply for Student Finance England UK ... This is what happens when you reply to spam email ... Find out what you can do to get your student finance application right first time and make sure you get your money for starting your course. ... Student Finance England 10,305 views. 1:36. Student ...